skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

This content will become publicly available on March 14, 2020

Title: Implications of Power Plant Idling and Cycling on Water Use Intensity

Abstract

Survey data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) was combined with data from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to explore ways in which operations might impact water use intensity (both withdrawals and consumption) at thermoelectric power plants. Two disparities in cooling and power systems operations were identified here that could impact water use intensity: 1) Idling Gap—where cooling systems continue to operate when their boilers and generators are completely idled; and 2) Cycling Gap—where cooling systems operate at full capacity, while their associated boiler and generator systems cycle over a range of loads. Analysis of the EIA and EPA data indicated that cooling systems operated on average 13% more than their corresponding power system (Idling Gap), while power systems operated on average 30% below full load when the boiler was reported as operating (Cycling Gap). Regression analysis was then performed to explore whether the degree of power plant idling/cycling could be related to the physical characteristics of the plant, its environment or time of year. While results suggested that individual power plants’ operations were unique, weak trends consistently pointed to a plant’s place on the dispatch curve as influencing patterns of cooling system, boiler, and generator operation. This insight bettermore » positions us to interpret reported power plant water use data as well as improve future water use projections.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE); USDOE Office of Policy (OP); USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1502969
Report Number(s):
SAND-2019-2869J
Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X; 673450
Grant/Contract Number:  
NA0003525
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 53; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Tidwell, Vincent, Shaneyfelt, Calvin Ray, Cauthen, Katherine, Klise, Geoffrey, Fields, Fletcher, Clement, Zachary, and Bauer, Diana. Implications of Power Plant Idling and Cycling on Water Use Intensity. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.est.9b00627.
Tidwell, Vincent, Shaneyfelt, Calvin Ray, Cauthen, Katherine, Klise, Geoffrey, Fields, Fletcher, Clement, Zachary, & Bauer, Diana. Implications of Power Plant Idling and Cycling on Water Use Intensity. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.est.9b00627.
Tidwell, Vincent, Shaneyfelt, Calvin Ray, Cauthen, Katherine, Klise, Geoffrey, Fields, Fletcher, Clement, Zachary, and Bauer, Diana. Thu . "Implications of Power Plant Idling and Cycling on Water Use Intensity". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.est.9b00627.
@article{osti_1502969,
title = {Implications of Power Plant Idling and Cycling on Water Use Intensity},
author = {Tidwell, Vincent and Shaneyfelt, Calvin Ray and Cauthen, Katherine and Klise, Geoffrey and Fields, Fletcher and Clement, Zachary and Bauer, Diana},
abstractNote = {Survey data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) was combined with data from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to explore ways in which operations might impact water use intensity (both withdrawals and consumption) at thermoelectric power plants. Two disparities in cooling and power systems operations were identified here that could impact water use intensity: 1) Idling Gap—where cooling systems continue to operate when their boilers and generators are completely idled; and 2) Cycling Gap—where cooling systems operate at full capacity, while their associated boiler and generator systems cycle over a range of loads. Analysis of the EIA and EPA data indicated that cooling systems operated on average 13% more than their corresponding power system (Idling Gap), while power systems operated on average 30% below full load when the boiler was reported as operating (Cycling Gap). Regression analysis was then performed to explore whether the degree of power plant idling/cycling could be related to the physical characteristics of the plant, its environment or time of year. While results suggested that individual power plants’ operations were unique, weak trends consistently pointed to a plant’s place on the dispatch curve as influencing patterns of cooling system, boiler, and generator operation. This insight better positions us to interpret reported power plant water use data as well as improve future water use projections.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.est.9b00627},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 8,
volume = 53,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {3}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on March 14, 2020
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share: