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Title: Study of optimal sizing for residential sorption heat pump system

Abstract

Gas-driven sorption heat pumps (GDSHP) show significant potential to reduce primary energy use, associated emissions and energy costs for space heating and domestic hot water production in residential applications. This study considered a bivalent heating system consisting of a sorption heat pump and a condensing boiler, and focuses on the optimal heating capacity of each of these components relative to each other. Two bivalent systems were considered: one based on a solid chemisorption cycle (GDSHPA), and one based on a resorption cycle (GDSHPB). Simulations of year-round space heating loads for two single-family houses, one in New York and the other Minnesota, were carried out and the seasonal gas coefficient of performance (SGCOP) calculated. The sorption heat pump’s design heating capacity as a fraction of the bivalent system’s total heating capacity was varied from 0 to 100%. Results show that SGCOP was effectively constant for sorption heat pump design capacity greater than 41% of the peak bivalent GDSHPA design capacity in Minnesota, and 32% for GDSHPB. In New York, these values were 42% and 34% for GDSHPA and GDSHPB respectively. The payback period was also evaluated based on postulated sorption heat pump component costs. The fastest payback was achieved with sorptionmore » heat pump design capacity between 22 and 44%.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3]
  1. SaltX Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Dalarna Univ., Borlange (Sweden); Mälardalen Univ., Västerås (Sweden)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1502521
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Thermal Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 150; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 1359-4311
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING

Citation Formats

Blackman, Corey, Gluesenkamp, Kyle R., Malhotra, Mini, and Yang, Zhiyao. Study of optimal sizing for residential sorption heat pump system. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2018.12.151.
Blackman, Corey, Gluesenkamp, Kyle R., Malhotra, Mini, & Yang, Zhiyao. Study of optimal sizing for residential sorption heat pump system. United States. doi:10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2018.12.151.
Blackman, Corey, Gluesenkamp, Kyle R., Malhotra, Mini, and Yang, Zhiyao. Fri . "Study of optimal sizing for residential sorption heat pump system". United States. doi:10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2018.12.151.
@article{osti_1502521,
title = {Study of optimal sizing for residential sorption heat pump system},
author = {Blackman, Corey and Gluesenkamp, Kyle R. and Malhotra, Mini and Yang, Zhiyao},
abstractNote = {Gas-driven sorption heat pumps (GDSHP) show significant potential to reduce primary energy use, associated emissions and energy costs for space heating and domestic hot water production in residential applications. This study considered a bivalent heating system consisting of a sorption heat pump and a condensing boiler, and focuses on the optimal heating capacity of each of these components relative to each other. Two bivalent systems were considered: one based on a solid chemisorption cycle (GDSHPA), and one based on a resorption cycle (GDSHPB). Simulations of year-round space heating loads for two single-family houses, one in New York and the other Minnesota, were carried out and the seasonal gas coefficient of performance (SGCOP) calculated. The sorption heat pump’s design heating capacity as a fraction of the bivalent system’s total heating capacity was varied from 0 to 100%. Results show that SGCOP was effectively constant for sorption heat pump design capacity greater than 41% of the peak bivalent GDSHPA design capacity in Minnesota, and 32% for GDSHPB. In New York, these values were 42% and 34% for GDSHPA and GDSHPB respectively. The payback period was also evaluated based on postulated sorption heat pump component costs. The fastest payback was achieved with sorption heat pump design capacity between 22 and 44%.},
doi = {10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2018.12.151},
journal = {Applied Thermal Engineering},
number = C,
volume = 150,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {1}
}

Journal Article:
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This content will become publicly available on January 4, 2020
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