skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Spatial distribution of prokaryotic communities in hypersaline soils

Abstract

Increasing salinization in wetland systems is a major threat to ecosystem services carried out by microbial communities. Therefore, it is paramount to understand how salinity drives both microbial community structures and their diversity. Here we selected a range of highly saline soils (EC 1:5 from 5.96 to 61.02 dS/m) from the Odiel Saltmarshes (SW Spain) and evaluated how the prokaryotic community structures and diversity were correlated to soil salinity and other soil physicochemical features. We found that these soils harbored unique communities mainly comprised of halophiles from the phyla Euryarchaeota, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Among the most abundant genera we found groups known for thriving in other hypersaline environments (Halorubrum, Natronomonas and Salinibacter) as well as others from which limited environmental information is available (Salinimicrobium, Fodinibius). In the studied soils, several site-specific properties, but not salinity, were correlated to the microbial community structure and individual abundances of individual genera. Therefore, the dominant halophiles residing in these soils are already well-adapted to a wide range of salinities.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2];  [2];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Univ. of Sevilla, Sevilla (Spain)
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1502392
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-136048
Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Vera-Gargallo, Blanca, Chowdhury, Taniya Roy, Brown, Joseph M., Fansler, Sarah J., Durán-Viseras, Ana, Sánchez-Porro, Cristina, Bailey, Vanessa L., Jansson, Janet K., and Ventosa, Antonio. Spatial distribution of prokaryotic communities in hypersaline soils. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-38339-z.
Vera-Gargallo, Blanca, Chowdhury, Taniya Roy, Brown, Joseph M., Fansler, Sarah J., Durán-Viseras, Ana, Sánchez-Porro, Cristina, Bailey, Vanessa L., Jansson, Janet K., & Ventosa, Antonio. Spatial distribution of prokaryotic communities in hypersaline soils. United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-38339-z.
Vera-Gargallo, Blanca, Chowdhury, Taniya Roy, Brown, Joseph M., Fansler, Sarah J., Durán-Viseras, Ana, Sánchez-Porro, Cristina, Bailey, Vanessa L., Jansson, Janet K., and Ventosa, Antonio. Mon . "Spatial distribution of prokaryotic communities in hypersaline soils". United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-38339-z. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1502392.
@article{osti_1502392,
title = {Spatial distribution of prokaryotic communities in hypersaline soils},
author = {Vera-Gargallo, Blanca and Chowdhury, Taniya Roy and Brown, Joseph M. and Fansler, Sarah J. and Durán-Viseras, Ana and Sánchez-Porro, Cristina and Bailey, Vanessa L. and Jansson, Janet K. and Ventosa, Antonio},
abstractNote = {Increasing salinization in wetland systems is a major threat to ecosystem services carried out by microbial communities. Therefore, it is paramount to understand how salinity drives both microbial community structures and their diversity. Here we selected a range of highly saline soils (EC1:5 from 5.96 to 61.02 dS/m) from the Odiel Saltmarshes (SW Spain) and evaluated how the prokaryotic community structures and diversity were correlated to soil salinity and other soil physicochemical features. We found that these soils harbored unique communities mainly comprised of halophiles from the phyla Euryarchaeota, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. Among the most abundant genera we found groups known for thriving in other hypersaline environments (Halorubrum, Natronomonas and Salinibacter) as well as others from which limited environmental information is available (Salinimicrobium, Fodinibius). In the studied soils, several site-specific properties, but not salinity, were correlated to the microbial community structure and individual abundances of individual genera. Therefore, the dominant halophiles residing in these soils are already well-adapted to a wide range of salinities.},
doi = {10.1038/s41598-018-38339-z},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = 1,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {2}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share: