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Title: Errors in nanoparticle growth rates inferred from measurements in chemically reacting aerosol systems

Abstract

In systems in which aerosols are being formed by chemical transformations,individual particles grow due to the addition of molecular species. Efforts to improve our understanding of particle growth often focus on attempts to reconcile observed growth rates with values calculated from models. However,because it is typically not possible to measure the growth rates of individual particles in chemically reacting systems, they must be inferred from measurements of aerosol properties such as size distributions, particle number concentrations, etc. Furthermore this work discusses errors in growth rates obtained using methods that are commonly employed for analyzing atmospheric data. We analyze “data” obtained by simulating the formation of aerosols in a system in which a single chemical species is formed at a constant rate, R. We show that the maximum overestimation error in measured growth rates occurs for collision-controlled nucleation in a single-component system in the absence of a preexisting aerosol, wall losses, evaporation or dilution,as this leads to the highest concentrations of nucleated particles. Those high concentrations lead to high coagulation rates that cause the nucleation mode to grow faster than would be caused by vapor condensation alone. We also show that preexisting particles, when coupled with evaporation, can significantly decrease themore » concentration of nucleated particles. This can lead to decreased discrepancies between measured growth rate and true growth rate by reducing coagulation among nucleated particles. However, as particle sink processes become stronger, measured growth rates can potentially be lower than true particle growth rates. We briefly discuss nucleation scenarios in which the observed growth rate approaches zero while the true growth rate does not.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
OSTI Identifier:
1502088
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0011780
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online); Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 1680-7324
Publisher:
European Geosciences Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Li, Chenxi, and McMurry, Peter H. Errors in nanoparticle growth rates inferred from measurements in chemically reacting aerosol systems. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.5194/acp-18-8979-2018.
Li, Chenxi, & McMurry, Peter H. Errors in nanoparticle growth rates inferred from measurements in chemically reacting aerosol systems. United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-8979-2018
Li, Chenxi, and McMurry, Peter H. Thu . "Errors in nanoparticle growth rates inferred from measurements in chemically reacting aerosol systems". United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.5194/acp-18-8979-2018. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1502088.
@article{osti_1502088,
title = {Errors in nanoparticle growth rates inferred from measurements in chemically reacting aerosol systems},
author = {Li, Chenxi and McMurry, Peter H.},
abstractNote = {In systems in which aerosols are being formed by chemical transformations,individual particles grow due to the addition of molecular species. Efforts to improve our understanding of particle growth often focus on attempts to reconcile observed growth rates with values calculated from models. However,because it is typically not possible to measure the growth rates of individual particles in chemically reacting systems, they must be inferred from measurements of aerosol properties such as size distributions, particle number concentrations, etc. Furthermore this work discusses errors in growth rates obtained using methods that are commonly employed for analyzing atmospheric data. We analyze “data” obtained by simulating the formation of aerosols in a system in which a single chemical species is formed at a constant rate, R. We show that the maximum overestimation error in measured growth rates occurs for collision-controlled nucleation in a single-component system in the absence of a preexisting aerosol, wall losses, evaporation or dilution,as this leads to the highest concentrations of nucleated particles. Those high concentrations lead to high coagulation rates that cause the nucleation mode to grow faster than would be caused by vapor condensation alone. We also show that preexisting particles, when coupled with evaporation, can significantly decrease the concentration of nucleated particles. This can lead to decreased discrepancies between measured growth rate and true growth rate by reducing coagulation among nucleated particles. However, as particle sink processes become stronger, measured growth rates can potentially be lower than true particle growth rates. We briefly discuss nucleation scenarios in which the observed growth rate approaches zero while the true growth rate does not.},
doi = {10.5194/acp-18-8979-2018},
journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online)},
number = 12,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {6}
}

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    Works referencing / citing this record:

    Robust metric for quantifying the importance of stochastic effects on nanoparticle growth
    journal, September 2018


    Estimating the influence of transport on aerosol size distributions during new particle formation events
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    • Cai, Runlong; Chandra, Indra; Yang, Dongsen
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