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Title: Modeling the contributions of global air temperature, synoptic-scale phenomena and soil moisture to near-surface static energy variability using artificial neural networks

Abstract

The static energy content of the atmosphere is increasing on a global scale, but exhibits important subglobal and subregional scales of variability and is a useful parameter for integrating the net effect of changes in the partitioning of energy at the surface and for improving understanding of the causes of so-called warming holes (i.e., locations with decreasing daily maximum air temperatures ( T) or increasing trends of lower magnitude than the global mean). Further, measures of the static energy content (herein the equivalent potential temperature, θ e) are more strongly linked to excess human mortality and morbidity than air temperature alone, and have great relevance in understanding causes of past heat-related excess mortality and making projections of possible future events that are likely to be associated with negative human health and economic consequences. New nonlinear statistical models for summertime daily maximum and minimum  θ e are developed and used to advance understanding of drivers of historical change and variability over the eastern USA. The predictor variables are an index of the daily global mean temperature, daily indices of the synoptic-scale meteorology derived from T and specific humidity ( Q) at 850 and 500 hPa geopotential heights ( Z), and spatiotemporally averagedmore » soil moisture (SM). SM is particularly important in determining the magnitude of θ e over regions that have previously been identified as exhibiting warming holes, confirming the key importance of SM in dictating the partitioning of net radiation into sensible and latent heat and dictating trends in near-surface T and θ e. Consistent with our a priori expectations, models built using artificial neural networks (ANNs) out-perform linear models that do not permit interaction of the predictor variables (global T, synoptic-scale meteorological conditions and SM). This is particularly marked in regions with high variability in minimum and maximum  θ e, where more complex models built using ANN with multiple hidden layers are better able to capture the day-to-day variability in θ e and the occurrence of extreme maximum  θ e. Over the entire domain, the ANN with three hidden layers exhibits high accuracy in predicting maximum  θ e > 347 K. The median hit rate for maximum  θ e > 347 K is > 0.60, while the median false alarm rate is ≈ 0.08.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2]
  1. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
  2. Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States). Dept. of Geography and Environmental Resource
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames, IA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1502053
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0016438
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online); Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue: 23; Journal ID: ISSN 1680-7324
Publisher:
European Geosciences Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Pryor, Sara C., Sullivan, Ryan C., and Schoof, Justin T. Modeling the contributions of global air temperature, synoptic-scale phenomena and soil moisture to near-surface static energy variability using artificial neural networks. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.5194/acp-17-14457-2017.
Pryor, Sara C., Sullivan, Ryan C., & Schoof, Justin T. Modeling the contributions of global air temperature, synoptic-scale phenomena and soil moisture to near-surface static energy variability using artificial neural networks. United States. doi:10.5194/acp-17-14457-2017.
Pryor, Sara C., Sullivan, Ryan C., and Schoof, Justin T. Wed . "Modeling the contributions of global air temperature, synoptic-scale phenomena and soil moisture to near-surface static energy variability using artificial neural networks". United States. doi:10.5194/acp-17-14457-2017. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1502053.
@article{osti_1502053,
title = {Modeling the contributions of global air temperature, synoptic-scale phenomena and soil moisture to near-surface static energy variability using artificial neural networks},
author = {Pryor, Sara C. and Sullivan, Ryan C. and Schoof, Justin T.},
abstractNote = {The static energy content of the atmosphere is increasing on a global scale, but exhibits important subglobal and subregional scales of variability and is a useful parameter for integrating the net effect of changes in the partitioning of energy at the surface and for improving understanding of the causes of so-called warming holes (i.e., locations with decreasing daily maximum air temperatures (T) or increasing trends of lower magnitude than the global mean). Further, measures of the static energy content (herein the equivalent potential temperature, θe) are more strongly linked to excess human mortality and morbidity than air temperature alone, and have great relevance in understanding causes of past heat-related excess mortality and making projections of possible future events that are likely to be associated with negative human health and economic consequences. New nonlinear statistical models for summertime daily maximum and minimum θe are developed and used to advance understanding of drivers of historical change and variability over the eastern USA. The predictor variables are an index of the daily global mean temperature, daily indices of the synoptic-scale meteorology derived from T and specific humidity (Q) at 850 and 500 hPa geopotential heights (Z), and spatiotemporally averaged soil moisture (SM). SM is particularly important in determining the magnitude of θe over regions that have previously been identified as exhibiting warming holes, confirming the key importance of SM in dictating the partitioning of net radiation into sensible and latent heat and dictating trends in near-surface T and θe. Consistent with our a priori expectations, models built using artificial neural networks (ANNs) out-perform linear models that do not permit interaction of the predictor variables (global T, synoptic-scale meteorological conditions and SM). This is particularly marked in regions with high variability in minimum and maximum θe, where more complex models built using ANN with multiple hidden layers are better able to capture the day-to-day variability in θe and the occurrence of extreme maximum θe. Over the entire domain, the ANN with three hidden layers exhibits high accuracy in predicting maximum θe > 347 K. The median hit rate for maximum θe > 347 K is > 0.60, while the median false alarm rate is ≈ 0.08.},
doi = {10.5194/acp-17-14457-2017},
journal = {Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (Online)},
number = 23,
volume = 17,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}

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