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Title: Solar-driven, highly sustained splitting of seawater into hydrogen and oxygen fuels

Electrolysis of water to generate hydrogen fuel is an attractive renewable energy storage technology. However, grid-scale freshwater electrolysis would put a heavy strain on vital water resources. Developing cheap electrocatalysts and electrodes that can sustain seawater splitting without chloride corrosion could address the water scarcity issue. Here we present a multilayer anode consisting of a nickel–iron hydroxide (NiFe) electrocatalyst layer uniformly coated on a nickel sulfide (NiSx) layer formed on porous Ni foam (NiFe/NiSx-Ni), affording superior catalytic activity and corrosion resistance in solar-driven alkaline seawater electrolysis operating at industrially required current densities (0.4 to 1 A/cm 2 ) over 1,000 h. A continuous, highly oxygen evolution reaction-active NiFe electrocatalyst layer drawing anodic currents toward water oxidation and an in situ-generated polyatomic sulfate and carbonate-rich passivating layers formed in the anode are responsible for chloride repelling and superior corrosion resistance of the salty-water-splitting anode.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0016165; AC02-76SF00515
Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Journal Volume: 116 Journal Issue: 14; Journal ID: ISSN 0027-8424
Publisher:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
OSTI Identifier:
1501719

Kuang, Yun, Kenney, Michael J., Meng, Yongtao, Hung, Wei-Hsuan, Liu, Yijin, Huang, Jianan Erick, Prasanna, Rohit, Li, Pengsong, Li, Yaping, Wang, Lei, Lin, Meng-Chang, McGehee, Michael D., Sun, Xiaoming, and Dai, Hongjie. Solar-driven, highly sustained splitting of seawater into hydrogen and oxygen fuels. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.1900556116.
Kuang, Yun, Kenney, Michael J., Meng, Yongtao, Hung, Wei-Hsuan, Liu, Yijin, Huang, Jianan Erick, Prasanna, Rohit, Li, Pengsong, Li, Yaping, Wang, Lei, Lin, Meng-Chang, McGehee, Michael D., Sun, Xiaoming, & Dai, Hongjie. Solar-driven, highly sustained splitting of seawater into hydrogen and oxygen fuels. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1900556116.
Kuang, Yun, Kenney, Michael J., Meng, Yongtao, Hung, Wei-Hsuan, Liu, Yijin, Huang, Jianan Erick, Prasanna, Rohit, Li, Pengsong, Li, Yaping, Wang, Lei, Lin, Meng-Chang, McGehee, Michael D., Sun, Xiaoming, and Dai, Hongjie. 2019. "Solar-driven, highly sustained splitting of seawater into hydrogen and oxygen fuels". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1900556116.
@article{osti_1501719,
title = {Solar-driven, highly sustained splitting of seawater into hydrogen and oxygen fuels},
author = {Kuang, Yun and Kenney, Michael J. and Meng, Yongtao and Hung, Wei-Hsuan and Liu, Yijin and Huang, Jianan Erick and Prasanna, Rohit and Li, Pengsong and Li, Yaping and Wang, Lei and Lin, Meng-Chang and McGehee, Michael D. and Sun, Xiaoming and Dai, Hongjie},
abstractNote = {Electrolysis of water to generate hydrogen fuel is an attractive renewable energy storage technology. However, grid-scale freshwater electrolysis would put a heavy strain on vital water resources. Developing cheap electrocatalysts and electrodes that can sustain seawater splitting without chloride corrosion could address the water scarcity issue. Here we present a multilayer anode consisting of a nickel–iron hydroxide (NiFe) electrocatalyst layer uniformly coated on a nickel sulfide (NiSx) layer formed on porous Ni foam (NiFe/NiSx-Ni), affording superior catalytic activity and corrosion resistance in solar-driven alkaline seawater electrolysis operating at industrially required current densities (0.4 to 1 A/cm 2 ) over 1,000 h. A continuous, highly oxygen evolution reaction-active NiFe electrocatalyst layer drawing anodic currents toward water oxidation and an in situ-generated polyatomic sulfate and carbonate-rich passivating layers formed in the anode are responsible for chloride repelling and superior corrosion resistance of the salty-water-splitting anode.},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.1900556116},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
number = 14,
volume = 116,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {3}
}

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