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Title: Nanoparticle emissions from residential wood combustion: A critical literature review, characterization, and recommendations

Abstract

The increased use of wood as a heating fuel in residential and small commercial buildings has increased concern about potential environmental and safety impacts, specifically particulate matter (PM) emissions in the nanometer range. Larger particles (> 2.5 µm) can be effectively removed from exhaust streams by emission control devices. However, nanoparticles (NP), due to their size, are more difficult to capture in exhaust flue gases. In addition, NPs have a higher surface to volume ratio, allowing them to absorb organic compounds, causing them to be more reactive than their larger counterparts. This review focuses here on the NPs produced from residential wood heating devices. Current emission regulations do not reflect the NP count or type produced from residential wood combustion, although most published studies show that a significant portion of the particles produced during combustion is in the nano-size range. Fuel type, device type and combustion periods have all shown to impact, at various degrees, the NPs produced. Contrary to common expectations, it appears that modern units may generate a higher count of NPs, although emitting less particulate mass than older units. This investigation supports arguments of needed particle type and count regulations in addition to the current mass basedmore » emission regulations. In addition to a critical review and analysis, recommendations are made regarding future testing, monitoring and environmental impact studies that address the significance of NP emissions.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Center for Life Cycle Analysis. Earth and Environmental Engineering; Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Sustainable Energy Technologies
  2. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Center for Life Cycle Analysis. Earth and Environmental Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)
OSTI Identifier:
1501573
Report Number(s):
BNL-211411-2019-JAAM
Journal ID: ISSN 1364-0321
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0012704; 29697; 63038
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 103; Journal ID: ISSN 1364-0321
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; biomass; wood stoves; nanoparticle; emissions; regulations

Citation Formats

Trojanowski, Rebecca, and Fthenakis, Vasilis. Nanoparticle emissions from residential wood combustion: A critical literature review, characterization, and recommendations. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1016/j.rser.2019.01.007.
Trojanowski, Rebecca, & Fthenakis, Vasilis. Nanoparticle emissions from residential wood combustion: A critical literature review, characterization, and recommendations. United States. doi:10.1016/j.rser.2019.01.007.
Trojanowski, Rebecca, and Fthenakis, Vasilis. Tue . "Nanoparticle emissions from residential wood combustion: A critical literature review, characterization, and recommendations". United States. doi:10.1016/j.rser.2019.01.007.
@article{osti_1501573,
title = {Nanoparticle emissions from residential wood combustion: A critical literature review, characterization, and recommendations},
author = {Trojanowski, Rebecca and Fthenakis, Vasilis},
abstractNote = {The increased use of wood as a heating fuel in residential and small commercial buildings has increased concern about potential environmental and safety impacts, specifically particulate matter (PM) emissions in the nanometer range. Larger particles (> 2.5 µm) can be effectively removed from exhaust streams by emission control devices. However, nanoparticles (NP), due to their size, are more difficult to capture in exhaust flue gases. In addition, NPs have a higher surface to volume ratio, allowing them to absorb organic compounds, causing them to be more reactive than their larger counterparts. This review focuses here on the NPs produced from residential wood heating devices. Current emission regulations do not reflect the NP count or type produced from residential wood combustion, although most published studies show that a significant portion of the particles produced during combustion is in the nano-size range. Fuel type, device type and combustion periods have all shown to impact, at various degrees, the NPs produced. Contrary to common expectations, it appears that modern units may generate a higher count of NPs, although emitting less particulate mass than older units. This investigation supports arguments of needed particle type and count regulations in addition to the current mass based emission regulations. In addition to a critical review and analysis, recommendations are made regarding future testing, monitoring and environmental impact studies that address the significance of NP emissions.},
doi = {10.1016/j.rser.2019.01.007},
journal = {Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews},
number = ,
volume = 103,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {1}
}

Journal Article:
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This content will become publicly available on January 15, 2020
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