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Title: Constraints from the dehydration of antigorite on high-conductivity anomalies in subduction zones

Abstract

Regions with high electrical conductivities in subduction zones have attracted a great deal of attention. Determining the exact origin of these anomalies could provide critical information about the water storage and cycling processes during subduction. Antigorite is the most important hydrous mineral within deep subduction zones. The dehydration of antigorite is believed to cause high-conductivity anomalies. To date, the effects of dehydration on the electrical conductivity of antigorite remain poorly understood. Here, we report new measurements of the electrical conductivity of both natural and hot-pressed antigorite at pressures of 4 and 3 GPa, respectively, and at temperatures reaching 1073 K. Here, we observed significantly enhanced conductivities when the antigorite was heated to temperatures beyond its thermodynamic stability field. Sharp increases in the electrical conductivity occurred at approximately 848 and 898 K following the decomposition of antigorite to forsterite, enstatite and aqueous fluids. High electrical conductivities reaching 1 S/m can be explained by the presence of an interconnected network of conductive aqueous fluids. Based on these results for the electrical conductivity of antigorite, we conclude that high-conductivity regions associated with subduction zones can be attributed to dehydration-induced fluids and the formation of interconnected networks of aqueous fluids during the dehydration ofmore » antigorite.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States)
  2. Lanzhou Univ., Lanzhou (China)
  3. Univ. of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)
  4. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  5. State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Research Foundation for the State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1500092
Grant/Contract Number:  
NA0002907
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES

Citation Formats

Wang, Duojun, Liu, Xiaowei, Liu, Tao, Shen, Kewei, Welch, David O., and Li, Baosheng. Constraints from the dehydration of antigorite on high-conductivity anomalies in subduction zones. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-16883-4.
Wang, Duojun, Liu, Xiaowei, Liu, Tao, Shen, Kewei, Welch, David O., & Li, Baosheng. Constraints from the dehydration of antigorite on high-conductivity anomalies in subduction zones. United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-16883-4.
Wang, Duojun, Liu, Xiaowei, Liu, Tao, Shen, Kewei, Welch, David O., and Li, Baosheng. Mon . "Constraints from the dehydration of antigorite on high-conductivity anomalies in subduction zones". United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-16883-4. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1500092.
@article{osti_1500092,
title = {Constraints from the dehydration of antigorite on high-conductivity anomalies in subduction zones},
author = {Wang, Duojun and Liu, Xiaowei and Liu, Tao and Shen, Kewei and Welch, David O. and Li, Baosheng},
abstractNote = {Regions with high electrical conductivities in subduction zones have attracted a great deal of attention. Determining the exact origin of these anomalies could provide critical information about the water storage and cycling processes during subduction. Antigorite is the most important hydrous mineral within deep subduction zones. The dehydration of antigorite is believed to cause high-conductivity anomalies. To date, the effects of dehydration on the electrical conductivity of antigorite remain poorly understood. Here, we report new measurements of the electrical conductivity of both natural and hot-pressed antigorite at pressures of 4 and 3 GPa, respectively, and at temperatures reaching 1073 K. Here, we observed significantly enhanced conductivities when the antigorite was heated to temperatures beyond its thermodynamic stability field. Sharp increases in the electrical conductivity occurred at approximately 848 and 898 K following the decomposition of antigorite to forsterite, enstatite and aqueous fluids. High electrical conductivities reaching 1 S/m can be explained by the presence of an interconnected network of conductive aqueous fluids. Based on these results for the electrical conductivity of antigorite, we conclude that high-conductivity regions associated with subduction zones can be attributed to dehydration-induced fluids and the formation of interconnected networks of aqueous fluids during the dehydration of antigorite.},
doi = {10.1038/s41598-017-16883-4},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = 1,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {12}
}

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