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Title: Metabolomics of sorghum roots during nitrogen stress reveals compromised metabolic capacity for salicylic acid biosynthesis

Abstract

Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench) is the fifth most productive cereal crop worldwide with some hybrids having high biomass yield traits making it promising for sustainable, economical biofuel production. To maximize biofuel feedstock yields, a more complete understanding of metabolic responses to low nitrogen (N) will be useful for incorporation in crop improvement efforts. In this study, 10 diverse sorghum entries (including inbreds and hybrids) were field-grown under low and full N conditions and roots were sampled at two time points for metabolomics and 16S amplicon sequencing. Roots of plants grown under low N showed altered metabolic profiles at both sampling dates including metabolites important in N storage and synthesis of aromatic amino acids. Complementary investigation of the rhizosphere microbiome revealed dominance by a single operational taxonomic unit (OTU) in an early sampling that was taxonomically assigned to the genus Pseudomonas. Abundance of this Pseudomonas OTU was significantly greater under low N in July and was decreased dramatically in September. Correlation of Pseudomonas abundance with root metabolites revealed a strong negative association with the defense hormone salicylic acid (SA) under full N but not under low N, suggesting reduced defense response. Roots from plants with N stress also contained reducedmore » phenylalanine, a precursor for SA, providing further evidence for compromised metabolic capacity for defense response under low N conditions. Our findings suggest that interactions between biotic and abiotic stresses may affect metabolic capacity for plant defense and need to be concurrently prioritized as breeding programs become established for biofuels production on marginal soils.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [4];  [4];  [2];  [3];  [5];  [6];  [6];  [1]
  1. Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)
  2. USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States)
  3. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
  4. Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)
  5. Clemson Univ., SC (United States)
  6. Univ. of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23), Biological Systems Science Division (SC-23.2 ); USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1499822
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1503920; OSTI ID: 1508062
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231; SC0014395
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Plant Direct
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 2475-4455
Publisher:
Wiley and American Society of Plant Biologists and Society for Experimental Biology
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; metabolism; metabolomics; microbiome; nitrogen; rhizosphere; roots; salicylic acid; sorghum; stress

Citation Formats

Sheflin, Amy M., Chiniquy, Dawn, Yuan, Chaohui, Goren, Emily, Kumar, Indrajit, Braud, Max, Brutnell, Thomas, Eveland, Andrea L., Tringe, Susannah, Liu, Peng, Kresovich, Stephen, Marsh, Ellen L., Schachtman, Daniel P., and Prenni, Jessica E. Metabolomics of sorghum roots during nitrogen stress reveals compromised metabolic capacity for salicylic acid biosynthesis. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1002/pld3.122.
Sheflin, Amy M., Chiniquy, Dawn, Yuan, Chaohui, Goren, Emily, Kumar, Indrajit, Braud, Max, Brutnell, Thomas, Eveland, Andrea L., Tringe, Susannah, Liu, Peng, Kresovich, Stephen, Marsh, Ellen L., Schachtman, Daniel P., & Prenni, Jessica E. Metabolomics of sorghum roots during nitrogen stress reveals compromised metabolic capacity for salicylic acid biosynthesis. United States. doi:10.1002/pld3.122.
Sheflin, Amy M., Chiniquy, Dawn, Yuan, Chaohui, Goren, Emily, Kumar, Indrajit, Braud, Max, Brutnell, Thomas, Eveland, Andrea L., Tringe, Susannah, Liu, Peng, Kresovich, Stephen, Marsh, Ellen L., Schachtman, Daniel P., and Prenni, Jessica E. Thu . "Metabolomics of sorghum roots during nitrogen stress reveals compromised metabolic capacity for salicylic acid biosynthesis". United States. doi:10.1002/pld3.122.
@article{osti_1499822,
title = {Metabolomics of sorghum roots during nitrogen stress reveals compromised metabolic capacity for salicylic acid biosynthesis},
author = {Sheflin, Amy M. and Chiniquy, Dawn and Yuan, Chaohui and Goren, Emily and Kumar, Indrajit and Braud, Max and Brutnell, Thomas and Eveland, Andrea L. and Tringe, Susannah and Liu, Peng and Kresovich, Stephen and Marsh, Ellen L. and Schachtman, Daniel P. and Prenni, Jessica E.},
abstractNote = {Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor [L.] Moench) is the fifth most productive cereal crop worldwide with some hybrids having high biomass yield traits making it promising for sustainable, economical biofuel production. To maximize biofuel feedstock yields, a more complete understanding of metabolic responses to low nitrogen (N) will be useful for incorporation in crop improvement efforts. In this study, 10 diverse sorghum entries (including inbreds and hybrids) were field-grown under low and full N conditions and roots were sampled at two time points for metabolomics and 16S amplicon sequencing. Roots of plants grown under low N showed altered metabolic profiles at both sampling dates including metabolites important in N storage and synthesis of aromatic amino acids. Complementary investigation of the rhizosphere microbiome revealed dominance by a single operational taxonomic unit (OTU) in an early sampling that was taxonomically assigned to the genus Pseudomonas. Abundance of this Pseudomonas OTU was significantly greater under low N in July and was decreased dramatically in September. Correlation of Pseudomonas abundance with root metabolites revealed a strong negative association with the defense hormone salicylic acid (SA) under full N but not under low N, suggesting reduced defense response. Roots from plants with N stress also contained reduced phenylalanine, a precursor for SA, providing further evidence for compromised metabolic capacity for defense response under low N conditions. Our findings suggest that interactions between biotic and abiotic stresses may affect metabolic capacity for plant defense and need to be concurrently prioritized as breeding programs become established for biofuels production on marginal soils.},
doi = {10.1002/pld3.122},
journal = {Plant Direct},
number = 3,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {3}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1002/pld3.122

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Works referenced in this record:

Search and clustering orders of magnitude faster than BLAST
journal, August 2010