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Title: Using a system’s equilibrium behavior to reduce its energy dissipation in nonequilibrium processes

Abstract

Cells must operate far from equilibrium, utilizing and dissipating energy continuously to maintain their organization and to avoid stasis and death. However, they must also avoid unnecessary waste of energy. Recent studies have revealed that molecular machines are extremely efficient thermodynamically compared with their macroscopic counterparts. However, the principles governing the efficient out-of-equilibrium operation of molecular machines remain a mystery. A theoretical framework has been recently formulated in which a generalized friction coefficient quantifies the energetic efficiency in nonequilibrium processes. Moreover, it posits that, to minimize energy dissipation, external control should drive the system along the reaction coordinate with a speed inversely proportional to the square root of that friction coefficient. Here, we demonstrate the utility of this theory for designing and understanding energetically efficient nonequilibrium processes through the unfolding and folding of single DNA hairpins.

Authors:
; ORCiD logo; ; ORCiD logo; ORCiD logo
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1499811
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Journal Volume: 116 Journal Issue: 13; Journal ID: ISSN 0027-8424
Publisher:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Tafoya, Sara, Large, Steven J., Liu, Shixin, Bustamante, Carlos, and Sivak, David A. Using a system’s equilibrium behavior to reduce its energy dissipation in nonequilibrium processes. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.1817778116.
Tafoya, Sara, Large, Steven J., Liu, Shixin, Bustamante, Carlos, & Sivak, David A. Using a system’s equilibrium behavior to reduce its energy dissipation in nonequilibrium processes. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1817778116.
Tafoya, Sara, Large, Steven J., Liu, Shixin, Bustamante, Carlos, and Sivak, David A. Wed . "Using a system’s equilibrium behavior to reduce its energy dissipation in nonequilibrium processes". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1817778116.
@article{osti_1499811,
title = {Using a system’s equilibrium behavior to reduce its energy dissipation in nonequilibrium processes},
author = {Tafoya, Sara and Large, Steven J. and Liu, Shixin and Bustamante, Carlos and Sivak, David A.},
abstractNote = {Cells must operate far from equilibrium, utilizing and dissipating energy continuously to maintain their organization and to avoid stasis and death. However, they must also avoid unnecessary waste of energy. Recent studies have revealed that molecular machines are extremely efficient thermodynamically compared with their macroscopic counterparts. However, the principles governing the efficient out-of-equilibrium operation of molecular machines remain a mystery. A theoretical framework has been recently formulated in which a generalized friction coefficient quantifies the energetic efficiency in nonequilibrium processes. Moreover, it posits that, to minimize energy dissipation, external control should drive the system along the reaction coordinate with a speed inversely proportional to the square root of that friction coefficient. Here, we demonstrate the utility of this theory for designing and understanding energetically efficient nonequilibrium processes through the unfolding and folding of single DNA hairpins.},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.1817778116},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
number = 13,
volume = 116,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {3}
}

Journal Article:
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This content will become publicly available on September 26, 2019
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