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Title: Spatially tracking carbon through the root-rhizosphere-soil system using laser ablation-IRMS

Abstract

The intimate relationships between plant roots, rhizosphere, and soil are fostered by the release of organic compounds from the plant into soil through various forms of rhizodeposition and the simultaneous harvestingof inorganic nutrients from the soil to the plant. Here we present a method to spatially track and map the migration of plant-derived carbon (C) through roots into the rhizosphere and surrounding soil using laser ablation-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LA-IRMS). Weused switchgrass microcosms containing soil from field plots at the Kellogg Biological Station (Hickory Corners, Michigan, USA), which have been cropped with switchgrass since 2008. We used a 13CO 2 tracerto isotopically label switchgrass plants for two diel cycles and tracked subsequent movement of labeled C using the spatially specific (<100 µm resolution) δ 13C analysis enabled by LA-IRMS.This approach permitted assessment of variable C flow through different roots and enabled mapping of spatial variability of C allocation to the rhizosphere. Highly 13C-enriched C (consistent with production during the 13CO 2 application period) extended ~0.5 – 1 mm from the root into the soil, suggesting that the majority of recent plant-derived C was within this distance of the root after 48 hours. Tracking the physical extent of root exudation intomore » the rhizosphere can help evaluate the localization of plant-microbe interactions in highly variable subsurface environments,and the use of the isotopic label can differentiate freshly fixed C (presumably from root exudates) from other types of subsurface C (e.g., plant necromass and microbial turnover). The LA-IRMS technique mayalso serve as a valuable screening technique to identify areas of high activity for additional microbial or geochemicalassays.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1499134
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1503718
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-135618
Journal ID: ISSN 1436-8730
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science; Journal ID: ISSN 1436-8730
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; carbon isotope; laser ablation‐isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LA‐IRMS); rhizosphere; soil; spatial

Citation Formats

Denis, Elizabeth H., Ilhardt, Peter D., Tucker, Abigail E., Huggett, Nicholas L., Rosnow, Joshua J., and Moran, James J.. Spatially tracking carbon through the root-rhizosphere-soil system using laser ablation-IRMS. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1002/jpln.201800301.
Denis, Elizabeth H., Ilhardt, Peter D., Tucker, Abigail E., Huggett, Nicholas L., Rosnow, Joshua J., & Moran, James J.. Spatially tracking carbon through the root-rhizosphere-soil system using laser ablation-IRMS. United States. doi:10.1002/jpln.201800301.
Denis, Elizabeth H., Ilhardt, Peter D., Tucker, Abigail E., Huggett, Nicholas L., Rosnow, Joshua J., and Moran, James J.. Thu . "Spatially tracking carbon through the root-rhizosphere-soil system using laser ablation-IRMS". United States. doi:10.1002/jpln.201800301.
@article{osti_1499134,
title = {Spatially tracking carbon through the root-rhizosphere-soil system using laser ablation-IRMS},
author = {Denis, Elizabeth H. and Ilhardt, Peter D. and Tucker, Abigail E. and Huggett, Nicholas L. and Rosnow, Joshua J. and Moran, James J.},
abstractNote = {The intimate relationships between plant roots, rhizosphere, and soil are fostered by the release of organic compounds from the plant into soil through various forms of rhizodeposition and the simultaneous harvestingof inorganic nutrients from the soil to the plant. Here we present a method to spatially track and map the migration of plant-derived carbon (C) through roots into the rhizosphere and surrounding soil using laser ablation-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (LA-IRMS). Weused switchgrass microcosms containing soil from field plots at the Kellogg Biological Station (Hickory Corners, Michigan, USA), which have been cropped with switchgrass since 2008. We used a 13CO2 tracerto isotopically label switchgrass plants for two diel cycles and tracked subsequent movement of labeled C using the spatially specific (<100 µm resolution) δ13C analysis enabled by LA-IRMS.This approach permitted assessment of variable C flow through different roots and enabled mapping of spatial variability of C allocation to the rhizosphere. Highly 13C-enriched C (consistent with production during the 13CO2 application period) extended ~0.5 – 1 mm from the root into the soil, suggesting that the majority of recent plant-derived C was within this distance of the root after 48 hours. Tracking the physical extent of root exudation into the rhizosphere can help evaluate the localization of plant-microbe interactions in highly variable subsurface environments,and the use of the isotopic label can differentiate freshly fixed C (presumably from root exudates) from other types of subsurface C (e.g., plant necromass and microbial turnover). The LA-IRMS technique mayalso serve as a valuable screening technique to identify areas of high activity for additional microbial or geochemicalassays.},
doi = {10.1002/jpln.201800301},
journal = {Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {3}
}

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This content will become publicly available on March 28, 2020
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