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Title: Positron Emission Tomography in Water Resources and Subsurface Energy Resources Engineering Research

Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated that positron emission tomography (PET) is a valuable tool for in-situ characterization of fluid transport in porous and fractured geologic media at the laboratory scale. While PET imaging is routinely used for clinical cancer diagnosis and preclinical medical research—and therefore imaging facilities are available at most research institutes—widespread adoption for applications in water resources and subsurface energy resources engineering have been limited by real and perceived challenges of working with this technique. In this study we discuss and address these challenges, and provide detailed analysis highlighting how positron emission tomography can complement and improve laboratory characterization of different subsurface fluid transport problems. The physics of PET are reviewed to provide a fundamental understanding of the sources of noise, resolution limits, and safety considerations. We then layout the methodology required to perform laboratory experiments imaged with PET, including a new protocol for radioactivity dosing optimization for imaging in geologic materials. Signal-to-noise and sensitivity analysis comparisons between PET and clinical X-ray computed tomography are performed to highlight how PET data can complement more traditional characterization methods, particularly for solute transport problems. Lastly, prior work is critically reviewed and discussed to provide a better understanding of the strengths andmore » weakness of PET and how to best utilize PET-derived data for future studies.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Imperial College London, London (England)
  2. Imperial College London, London (England)
  3. Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Univ., CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Contributing Org.:
Stanford University Department of Energy Resources Engineering
OSTI Identifier:
1499086
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0019165
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advances in Water Resources
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 427; Journal ID: ISSN 0309-1708
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 02 PETROLEUM; 04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 58 GEOSCIENCES; 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; Positron emission tomography; X-ray computed tomography; Imaging; Solute mixing and spreading; fractures

Citation Formats

Zahasky, Christopher, Kurotori, Takeshi, Pini, Ronny, and Benson, Sally M. Positron Emission Tomography in Water Resources and Subsurface Energy Resources Engineering Research. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1016/j.advwatres.2019.03.003.
Zahasky, Christopher, Kurotori, Takeshi, Pini, Ronny, & Benson, Sally M. Positron Emission Tomography in Water Resources and Subsurface Energy Resources Engineering Research. United States. doi:10.1016/j.advwatres.2019.03.003.
Zahasky, Christopher, Kurotori, Takeshi, Pini, Ronny, and Benson, Sally M. Sat . "Positron Emission Tomography in Water Resources and Subsurface Energy Resources Engineering Research". United States. doi:10.1016/j.advwatres.2019.03.003.
@article{osti_1499086,
title = {Positron Emission Tomography in Water Resources and Subsurface Energy Resources Engineering Research},
author = {Zahasky, Christopher and Kurotori, Takeshi and Pini, Ronny and Benson, Sally M.},
abstractNote = {Recent studies have demonstrated that positron emission tomography (PET) is a valuable tool for in-situ characterization of fluid transport in porous and fractured geologic media at the laboratory scale. While PET imaging is routinely used for clinical cancer diagnosis and preclinical medical research—and therefore imaging facilities are available at most research institutes—widespread adoption for applications in water resources and subsurface energy resources engineering have been limited by real and perceived challenges of working with this technique. In this study we discuss and address these challenges, and provide detailed analysis highlighting how positron emission tomography can complement and improve laboratory characterization of different subsurface fluid transport problems. The physics of PET are reviewed to provide a fundamental understanding of the sources of noise, resolution limits, and safety considerations. We then layout the methodology required to perform laboratory experiments imaged with PET, including a new protocol for radioactivity dosing optimization for imaging in geologic materials. Signal-to-noise and sensitivity analysis comparisons between PET and clinical X-ray computed tomography are performed to highlight how PET data can complement more traditional characterization methods, particularly for solute transport problems. Lastly, prior work is critically reviewed and discussed to provide a better understanding of the strengths and weakness of PET and how to best utilize PET-derived data for future studies.},
doi = {10.1016/j.advwatres.2019.03.003},
journal = {Advances in Water Resources},
number = ,
volume = 427,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {3}
}

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This content will become publicly available on March 9, 2020
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