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Title: Assessment of co-sintering as a fabrication approach for metal-supported proton-conducting solid oxide cells

Abstract

Proton conducting oxide electrolyte materials could potentially lower the operating temperature of metal-supported solid oxide cells (MS-SOCs) to the intermediate range 400 to 600 °C. The porous metal substrate provides the advantages of MS-SOCs such as high thermal and redox cycling tolerance, low-cost of structural materials, and mechanical ruggedness. In this work, viability of co-sintering fabrication of metal-supported proton conducting solid oxide cells is investigated. Candidate proton conducting oxides including perovskite oxides BaZr 0.7Ce 0.2Y 0.1O 3-δ, SrZr 0.5Ce 0.4Y 0.1O 3-δ, and Ba 3Ca 1.18Nb 1.82O 9-δ, pyrochlore oxides La 1.95Ca 0.05Zr 2O 7-δ and La 2Ce 2O 7, and acceptor doped rare-earth ortho-niobate La 0.99Ca 0.01NbO 4 are synthesized via solid state reactive or sol-gel methods. These ceramics are sintered at 1450 °C in reducing environment alone and supported on Fe-Cr alloy metal support, and their key characteristics such as phase formation, sintering property, and chemical compatibility with metal support are determined. Most electrolyte candidates suffer from one or more challenges identified for this fabrication approach, including: phase decomposition in reducing atmosphere, evaporation of electrolyte constituents, contamination of the electrolyte with Si and Cr from the metal support, and incomplete electrolyte sintering. In contrast, La 0.99Ca 0.01NbO 4more » is found to be highly compatible with the metal support and co-sintering processing in reducing atmosphere. A metal-supported cell is fabricated with La 0.99Ca 0.01NbO 4 electrolyte, ferritic stainless steel support, Pt air electrode and nanoparticulate ceria-Ni hydrogen electrocatalyst. The total resistance is 50 Ω·cm 2 at 600 °C. This work clearly demonstrates the challenges, opportunities, and breakthrough of metal-supported proton-conducting solid oxide cells by co-sintering fabrication.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Fuel Cell Technologies Office (EE-3F); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS) (SC-27)
OSTI Identifier:
1498696
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1547875
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231; EE0008080
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Solid State Ionics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 332; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0167-2738
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE

Citation Formats

Wang, Ruofan, Byrne, Conor, and Tucker, Michael C. Assessment of co-sintering as a fabrication approach for metal-supported proton-conducting solid oxide cells. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ssi.2019.01.004.
Wang, Ruofan, Byrne, Conor, & Tucker, Michael C. Assessment of co-sintering as a fabrication approach for metal-supported proton-conducting solid oxide cells. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ssi.2019.01.004.
Wang, Ruofan, Byrne, Conor, and Tucker, Michael C. Fri . "Assessment of co-sintering as a fabrication approach for metal-supported proton-conducting solid oxide cells". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ssi.2019.01.004.
@article{osti_1498696,
title = {Assessment of co-sintering as a fabrication approach for metal-supported proton-conducting solid oxide cells},
author = {Wang, Ruofan and Byrne, Conor and Tucker, Michael C.},
abstractNote = {Proton conducting oxide electrolyte materials could potentially lower the operating temperature of metal-supported solid oxide cells (MS-SOCs) to the intermediate range 400 to 600 °C. The porous metal substrate provides the advantages of MS-SOCs such as high thermal and redox cycling tolerance, low-cost of structural materials, and mechanical ruggedness. In this work, viability of co-sintering fabrication of metal-supported proton conducting solid oxide cells is investigated. Candidate proton conducting oxides including perovskite oxides BaZr0.7Ce0.2Y0.1O3-δ, SrZr0.5Ce 0.4Y0.1O3-δ, and Ba3Ca1.18Nb1.82O9-δ, pyrochlore oxides La1.95Ca0.05Zr2O7-δ and La2Ce2O7, and acceptor doped rare-earth ortho-niobate La0.99Ca0.01NbO4 are synthesized via solid state reactive or sol-gel methods. These ceramics are sintered at 1450 °C in reducing environment alone and supported on Fe-Cr alloy metal support, and their key characteristics such as phase formation, sintering property, and chemical compatibility with metal support are determined. Most electrolyte candidates suffer from one or more challenges identified for this fabrication approach, including: phase decomposition in reducing atmosphere, evaporation of electrolyte constituents, contamination of the electrolyte with Si and Cr from the metal support, and incomplete electrolyte sintering. In contrast, La0.99Ca0.01NbO4 is found to be highly compatible with the metal support and co-sintering processing in reducing atmosphere. A metal-supported cell is fabricated with La0.99Ca0.01NbO4 electrolyte, ferritic stainless steel support, Pt air electrode and nanoparticulate ceria-Ni hydrogen electrocatalyst. The total resistance is 50 Ω·cm2 at 600 °C. This work clearly demonstrates the challenges, opportunities, and breakthrough of metal-supported proton-conducting solid oxide cells by co-sintering fabrication.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ssi.2019.01.004},
journal = {Solid State Ionics},
number = C,
volume = 332,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {1}
}

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