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Title: High-speed X-ray imaging of the Leidenfrost collapse

Abstract

The Leidenfrost layer is characterized by an insulating vapor film between a heated surface and an ambient liquid. The collapse of this film has been canonically theorized to occur from an interfacial instability between the liquid and vapor phases. The interfacial instability alone, however, is insufficient to explain the known influence of the surface on the film collapse process. In this work, we provide visual evidence for two key mechanisms governing the film collapse: the interfacial instability, and the nucleation of vapor upon multiple non-terminal liquid-solid contacts. These results were obtained by implementing high-speed X-ray imaging of the film collapse on a heated sphere submerged in liquid-water. The X-ray images were synchronized with a second high-speed visible light camera and two thermocouples to provide insight into the film formation and film collapse processes. Lastly, the dynamic film thickness was quantified by analysis of the X-ray images. This helped assess the influence of surface roughness on the disruption of the film. The results of this work encourage further investigation into non-linear stability theory to consolidate the role of the surface on the liquid-vapor interface during the film collapse process.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)
  2. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Lemont, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Graduate Student Research (SCGSR) Program; USDOE Office of Science (SC), Office of Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists
OSTI Identifier:
1498515
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Jones, Paul R., Chuang, Chihpin, Sun, Tao, Zhao, Tom Y., Fezzaa, Kamel, Takase, Juan C., Singh, Dileep, and Patankar, Neelesh A. High-speed X-ray imaging of the Leidenfrost collapse. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-36603-w.
Jones, Paul R., Chuang, Chihpin, Sun, Tao, Zhao, Tom Y., Fezzaa, Kamel, Takase, Juan C., Singh, Dileep, & Patankar, Neelesh A. High-speed X-ray imaging of the Leidenfrost collapse. United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-36603-w.
Jones, Paul R., Chuang, Chihpin, Sun, Tao, Zhao, Tom Y., Fezzaa, Kamel, Takase, Juan C., Singh, Dileep, and Patankar, Neelesh A. Thu . "High-speed X-ray imaging of the Leidenfrost collapse". United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-36603-w. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1498515.
@article{osti_1498515,
title = {High-speed X-ray imaging of the Leidenfrost collapse},
author = {Jones, Paul R. and Chuang, Chihpin and Sun, Tao and Zhao, Tom Y. and Fezzaa, Kamel and Takase, Juan C. and Singh, Dileep and Patankar, Neelesh A.},
abstractNote = {The Leidenfrost layer is characterized by an insulating vapor film between a heated surface and an ambient liquid. The collapse of this film has been canonically theorized to occur from an interfacial instability between the liquid and vapor phases. The interfacial instability alone, however, is insufficient to explain the known influence of the surface on the film collapse process. In this work, we provide visual evidence for two key mechanisms governing the film collapse: the interfacial instability, and the nucleation of vapor upon multiple non-terminal liquid-solid contacts. These results were obtained by implementing high-speed X-ray imaging of the film collapse on a heated sphere submerged in liquid-water. The X-ray images were synchronized with a second high-speed visible light camera and two thermocouples to provide insight into the film formation and film collapse processes. Lastly, the dynamic film thickness was quantified by analysis of the X-ray images. This helped assess the influence of surface roughness on the disruption of the film. The results of this work encourage further investigation into non-linear stability theory to consolidate the role of the surface on the liquid-vapor interface during the film collapse process.},
doi = {10.1038/s41598-018-36603-w},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = 1,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {2}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

Review on thermal energy storage with phase change: materials, heat transfer analysis and applications
journal, February 2003

  • Zalba, Belén; Marı́n, José Ma; Cabeza, Luisa F.
  • Applied Thermal Engineering, Vol. 23, Issue 3, p. 251-283
  • DOI: 10.1016/S1359-4311(02)00192-8