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Title: Fabrication of Low-Tortuosity Ultrahigh-Area-Capacity Battery Electrodes through Magnetic Alignment of Emulsion-Based Slurries

Abstract

High energy–density, low–cost batteries are critically important to a variety of applications ranging from portable electronics to electric vehicles (EVs) and grid–scale storage. While tremendous research effort has been focused on new materials or chemistries with high energy–density potential, design innovations such as low–tortuosity thick electrodes are another promising path toward higher energy density and lower cost. Growing demand for fast–charging batteries has also highlighted the need for negative electrodes that can accept high rate charging without metal deposition; low tortuosity can be a benefit in this regard. However, a general and scalable fabrication method for low–tortuosity electrodes is currently lacking. Here an emulsion–based, magnetic–alignment approach to producing thick electrodes (>400 µm thickness) with ultrahigh areal capacity (up to ≈14 mAh cm –2 vs 2–4 mAh cm –2 for conventional lithium ion) is reported. The process is demonstrated for LiCoO 2 and meso–carbon microbead graphite. The LiCoO 2 cathodes are confirmed to have low tortuosity via DC–depolarization experiments and deliver high areal capacity (>10 mAh cm –2) in galvanostatic discharge tests at practical C–rates and model EV drive–cycle tests. Lastly, this simple fabrication method can potentially be applied to many other active materials to enable thick, low–tortuosity electrodes.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4]
  1. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai, (China); Shanghai Electrochemical Energy Devices Research Center, Shanghai (China)
  2. Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States)
  3. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  4. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1498274
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1483709
Report Number(s):
BNL-211313-2019-JAAM
Journal ID: ISSN 1614-6832
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0012704; AC02-05CH11231; 7056592; AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Energy Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1614-6832
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; emulsion; low‐tortuosity; magnetic alignment; thick electrodes

Citation Formats

Li, Linsen, Erb, Randall M., Wang, Jiajun, Wang, Jun, and Chiang, Yet -Ming. Fabrication of Low-Tortuosity Ultrahigh-Area-Capacity Battery Electrodes through Magnetic Alignment of Emulsion-Based Slurries. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1002/aenm.201802472.
Li, Linsen, Erb, Randall M., Wang, Jiajun, Wang, Jun, & Chiang, Yet -Ming. Fabrication of Low-Tortuosity Ultrahigh-Area-Capacity Battery Electrodes through Magnetic Alignment of Emulsion-Based Slurries. United States. doi:10.1002/aenm.201802472.
Li, Linsen, Erb, Randall M., Wang, Jiajun, Wang, Jun, and Chiang, Yet -Ming. Wed . "Fabrication of Low-Tortuosity Ultrahigh-Area-Capacity Battery Electrodes through Magnetic Alignment of Emulsion-Based Slurries". United States. doi:10.1002/aenm.201802472.
@article{osti_1498274,
title = {Fabrication of Low-Tortuosity Ultrahigh-Area-Capacity Battery Electrodes through Magnetic Alignment of Emulsion-Based Slurries},
author = {Li, Linsen and Erb, Randall M. and Wang, Jiajun and Wang, Jun and Chiang, Yet -Ming},
abstractNote = {High energy–density, low–cost batteries are critically important to a variety of applications ranging from portable electronics to electric vehicles (EVs) and grid–scale storage. While tremendous research effort has been focused on new materials or chemistries with high energy–density potential, design innovations such as low–tortuosity thick electrodes are another promising path toward higher energy density and lower cost. Growing demand for fast–charging batteries has also highlighted the need for negative electrodes that can accept high rate charging without metal deposition; low tortuosity can be a benefit in this regard. However, a general and scalable fabrication method for low–tortuosity electrodes is currently lacking. Here an emulsion–based, magnetic–alignment approach to producing thick electrodes (>400 µm thickness) with ultrahigh areal capacity (up to ≈14 mAh cm–2 vs 2–4 mAh cm–2 for conventional lithium ion) is reported. The process is demonstrated for LiCoO2 and meso–carbon microbead graphite. The LiCoO2 cathodes are confirmed to have low tortuosity via DC–depolarization experiments and deliver high areal capacity (>10 mAh cm–2) in galvanostatic discharge tests at practical C–rates and model EV drive–cycle tests. Lastly, this simple fabrication method can potentially be applied to many other active materials to enable thick, low–tortuosity electrodes.},
doi = {10.1002/aenm.201802472},
journal = {Advanced Energy Materials},
number = 2,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {11}
}

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