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Title: Interface Characterization within a Nuclear Fuel Plate

Abstract

To predict the performance of nuclear fuels and materials, irradiated fuel plates must be characterized efficiently and accurately in highly radioactive environments. The characterization must take place remotely and work in settings largely inhospitable to modern digital instrumentation. Characterization techniques based on non-contacting laser sensing methods enable remote operation in a robust manner within a hot-cell environment. Laser characterization instrumentation can offer high spatial resolution and remain effective for scanning large areas. A laser shock (LS) system is currently being developed as a post-irradiation examination (PIE) technique in the hot fuel examination facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The laser shock technique will characterize material properties and failure loads/mechanisms in various composite components and materials such as plate fuel and next-generation fuel forms in high radiation areas. The laser shock-technique induces large amplitude shock waves to mechanically characterize interfaces such as the fuel–clad bond. As part of the laser shock system, a laser-based ultrasonic C-scan system will be used to detect and characterize debonding caused by the application of the laser shock. The laser shock system has been used to characterize the resulting bond strength within plate fuels which have been fabricated using different fabrication processes. Furthermore, themore » results of this study will be to select the fabrication process that provides the strongest interface.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1497055
Report Number(s):
[INL/JOU-18-52160-Rev000]
[Journal ID: ISSN 2076-3417; ASPCC7]
Grant/Contract Number:  
[AC07-05ID14517]
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Sciences
Additional Journal Information:
[ Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 2]; Journal ID: ISSN 2076-3417
Publisher:
MDPI
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; laser shock; Laser ultrasonic NDE; sensor; nuclear fuel plate

Citation Formats

Smith, James A., Scott, Clark L., Benefiel, Brad C., and Rabin, Barry. Interface Characterization within a Nuclear Fuel Plate. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.3390/app9020249.
Smith, James A., Scott, Clark L., Benefiel, Brad C., & Rabin, Barry. Interface Characterization within a Nuclear Fuel Plate. United States. doi:10.3390/app9020249.
Smith, James A., Scott, Clark L., Benefiel, Brad C., and Rabin, Barry. Fri . "Interface Characterization within a Nuclear Fuel Plate". United States. doi:10.3390/app9020249. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1497055.
@article{osti_1497055,
title = {Interface Characterization within a Nuclear Fuel Plate},
author = {Smith, James A. and Scott, Clark L. and Benefiel, Brad C. and Rabin, Barry},
abstractNote = {To predict the performance of nuclear fuels and materials, irradiated fuel plates must be characterized efficiently and accurately in highly radioactive environments. The characterization must take place remotely and work in settings largely inhospitable to modern digital instrumentation. Characterization techniques based on non-contacting laser sensing methods enable remote operation in a robust manner within a hot-cell environment. Laser characterization instrumentation can offer high spatial resolution and remain effective for scanning large areas. A laser shock (LS) system is currently being developed as a post-irradiation examination (PIE) technique in the hot fuel examination facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The laser shock technique will characterize material properties and failure loads/mechanisms in various composite components and materials such as plate fuel and next-generation fuel forms in high radiation areas. The laser shock-technique induces large amplitude shock waves to mechanically characterize interfaces such as the fuel–clad bond. As part of the laser shock system, a laser-based ultrasonic C-scan system will be used to detect and characterize debonding caused by the application of the laser shock. The laser shock system has been used to characterize the resulting bond strength within plate fuels which have been fabricated using different fabrication processes. Furthermore, the results of this study will be to select the fabrication process that provides the strongest interface.},
doi = {10.3390/app9020249},
journal = {Applied Sciences},
number = [2],
volume = [9],
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {1}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

Adhesive bond testing of carbon–epoxy composites by laser shockwave
journal, December 2010

  • Perton, Mathieu; Blouin, Alain; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre
  • Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, Vol. 44, Issue 3
  • DOI: 10.1088/0022-3727/44/3/034012

Fabrication of Monolithic RERTR Fuels by Hot Isostatic Pressing
journal, November 2010

  • Jue, Jan-Fong; Park, Blair H.; Clark, Curtis R.
  • Nuclear Technology, Vol. 172, Issue 2
  • DOI: 10.13182/NT10-A10905

Bulge Testing and Interface Fracture Characterization of Plasma-Sprayed and HIP Bonded Zr Coatings on U-Mo
journal, December 2014