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Title: Shape-Preserved Transformation of Biological Cells into Synthetic Hydrogel Microparticles

Abstract

The synthesis of materials that can mimic the mechanical, and ultimately functional, properties of biological cells can broadly impact the development of biomimetic materials, as well as engineered tissues and therapeutics. Yet, it is challenging to synthesize, for example, microparticles that share both the anisotropic shapes and the elastic properties of living cells. Here in paper, a cell-directed route to replicate cellular structures into synthetic hydrogels such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) is described. First, the internal and external surfaces of chemically fixed cells are replicated in a conformal layer of silica using a sol–gel process. The template is subsequently removed to render shape-preserved, mesoporous silica replicas. Infiltration and cross-linking of PEG precursors and dissolution of the silica result in a soft hydrogel replica of the cellular template as demonstrated using erythrocytes, HeLa, and neuronal cultured cells. The elastic modulus can be tuned over an order of magnitude (≈10–100 kPa) though with a high degree of variability. Furthermore, synthesis without removing the biotemplate results in stimuli-responsive particles that swell/deswell in response to environmental cues. Overall, this work provides a foundation to develop soft particles with nearly limitless architectural complexity derived from dynamic biological templates.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Materials Lab.
  2. Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States). Center for Biomedical Engineering and Dept. of Molecular Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biotechnology
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); National Institutes of Health (NIH)
OSTI Identifier:
1496972
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1491426
Report Number(s):
SAND-2019-1524J
Journal ID: ISSN 2366-7478; 672501
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000; R01 AR063642; P30 GM122732; NA0003525
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Biosystems
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Advanced Biosystems; Journal ID: ISSN 2366-7478
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; artificial cells; hydrogel particles; red blood cell; mimics silica

Citation Formats

Meyer, Kristin C., Labriola, Nicholas R., Darling, Eric M., and Kaehr, Bryan. Shape-Preserved Transformation of Biological Cells into Synthetic Hydrogel Microparticles. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1002/adbi.201800285.
Meyer, Kristin C., Labriola, Nicholas R., Darling, Eric M., & Kaehr, Bryan. Shape-Preserved Transformation of Biological Cells into Synthetic Hydrogel Microparticles. United States. doi:10.1002/adbi.201800285.
Meyer, Kristin C., Labriola, Nicholas R., Darling, Eric M., and Kaehr, Bryan. Mon . "Shape-Preserved Transformation of Biological Cells into Synthetic Hydrogel Microparticles". United States. doi:10.1002/adbi.201800285.
@article{osti_1496972,
title = {Shape-Preserved Transformation of Biological Cells into Synthetic Hydrogel Microparticles},
author = {Meyer, Kristin C. and Labriola, Nicholas R. and Darling, Eric M. and Kaehr, Bryan},
abstractNote = {The synthesis of materials that can mimic the mechanical, and ultimately functional, properties of biological cells can broadly impact the development of biomimetic materials, as well as engineered tissues and therapeutics. Yet, it is challenging to synthesize, for example, microparticles that share both the anisotropic shapes and the elastic properties of living cells. Here in paper, a cell-directed route to replicate cellular structures into synthetic hydrogels such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) is described. First, the internal and external surfaces of chemically fixed cells are replicated in a conformal layer of silica using a sol–gel process. The template is subsequently removed to render shape-preserved, mesoporous silica replicas. Infiltration and cross-linking of PEG precursors and dissolution of the silica result in a soft hydrogel replica of the cellular template as demonstrated using erythrocytes, HeLa, and neuronal cultured cells. The elastic modulus can be tuned over an order of magnitude (≈10–100 kPa) though with a high degree of variability. Furthermore, synthesis without removing the biotemplate results in stimuli-responsive particles that swell/deswell in response to environmental cues. Overall, this work provides a foundation to develop soft particles with nearly limitless architectural complexity derived from dynamic biological templates.},
doi = {10.1002/adbi.201800285},
journal = {Advanced Biosystems},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {1}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

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