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Title: Siberian Miscanthus sacchariflorus accessions surpass the exceptional chilling tolerance of the most widely cultivated clone of Miscanthus x giganteus

Abstract

Abstract Chilling temperatures (0–15°C) inhibit photosynthesis in most C 4 grasses, yet photosynthesis is chilling tolerant in the ‘Illinois’ clone of the C 4 grass Miscanthus x giganteus , a candidate cellulosic bioenergy crop. M. x giganteus is a hybrid between Miscanthus sacchariflorus and Miscanthus sinensis ; therefore chilling‐tolerant parent lines might produce hybrids superior to the current clone. Recently a collection of M. sacchariflorus from Siberia, the apparent low temperature limit of natural distribution , became available, which may be a source for chilling tolerance. The collection was screened for chilling tolerance of photosynthesis by measuring dark‐adapted maximum quantum yield of PSII photochemistry ( F v /F m ) on plants in the field in cool weather. Superior accessions were selected for further phenotyping: plants were grown at 25°C, transferred to 10°C (chilling) for 15 days, and returned to 25°C for 7 days (recovery). Two experiments assessed: (a) light‐saturated net photosynthetic rate ( A sat ) and operating quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (Φ PSII ), (b) response of net leaf CO 2 uptake ( A ) to intercellular [CO 2 ] ( c i ). Three accessions showed superior chilling tolerance: RU2012‐069 and RU2012‐114 achieved A sat up to doublemore » that of M. x giganteus prior to and during chilling, due to increased c i ‐ saturated photosynthesis ( V max ). RU2012‐069 and RU2012‐114 also maintained greater levels of Φ PSII during chilling, indicating reduced photodamage. Additionally, accession RU2012‐112 maintained a stable A sat throughout the 15‐day chilling period, while A sat continuously declined in other accessions; this suggests RU2012‐112 could outperform others in lengthy chilling periods. Plants were returned to 25°C after the chilling period; M. x giganteus showed the weakest recovery after 1 day, but a strong recovery after 1 week. This study has therefore identified important genetic resources for the synthesis of improved lines of M. x giganteus , which could facilitate the displacement of fossil fuels by cellulosic bioenergy.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3]
  1. Departments of Crop Sciences and of Plant Biology Carl Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois Urbana Illinois
  2. Department of Agroecology Aarhus University Centre for Circular Bioeconomy, Aarhus University Tjele Denmark
  3. Departments of Crop Sciences and of Plant Biology Carl Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois Urbana Illinois, Lancaster Environment Centre Lancaster University Lancaster UK
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
OSTI Identifier:
1496664
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1496665; OSTI ID: 1611785
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0012379
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Global Change Biology. Bioenergy
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Global Change Biology. Bioenergy Journal Volume: 11 Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 1757-1693
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Agriculture; Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology; Energy & Fuels

Citation Formats

Pignon, Charles P., Spitz, Idan, Sacks, Erik J., Jørgensen, Uffe, Kørup, Kirsten, and Long, Stephen P. Siberian Miscanthus sacchariflorus accessions surpass the exceptional chilling tolerance of the most widely cultivated clone of Miscanthus x giganteus. United Kingdom: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1111/gcbb.12599.
Pignon, Charles P., Spitz, Idan, Sacks, Erik J., Jørgensen, Uffe, Kørup, Kirsten, & Long, Stephen P. Siberian Miscanthus sacchariflorus accessions surpass the exceptional chilling tolerance of the most widely cultivated clone of Miscanthus x giganteus. United Kingdom. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcbb.12599
Pignon, Charles P., Spitz, Idan, Sacks, Erik J., Jørgensen, Uffe, Kørup, Kirsten, and Long, Stephen P. Tue . "Siberian Miscanthus sacchariflorus accessions surpass the exceptional chilling tolerance of the most widely cultivated clone of Miscanthus x giganteus". United Kingdom. https://doi.org/10.1111/gcbb.12599.
@article{osti_1496664,
title = {Siberian Miscanthus sacchariflorus accessions surpass the exceptional chilling tolerance of the most widely cultivated clone of Miscanthus x giganteus},
author = {Pignon, Charles P. and Spitz, Idan and Sacks, Erik J. and Jørgensen, Uffe and Kørup, Kirsten and Long, Stephen P.},
abstractNote = {Abstract Chilling temperatures (0–15°C) inhibit photosynthesis in most C 4 grasses, yet photosynthesis is chilling tolerant in the ‘Illinois’ clone of the C 4 grass Miscanthus x giganteus , a candidate cellulosic bioenergy crop. M. x giganteus is a hybrid between Miscanthus sacchariflorus and Miscanthus sinensis ; therefore chilling‐tolerant parent lines might produce hybrids superior to the current clone. Recently a collection of M. sacchariflorus from Siberia, the apparent low temperature limit of natural distribution , became available, which may be a source for chilling tolerance. The collection was screened for chilling tolerance of photosynthesis by measuring dark‐adapted maximum quantum yield of PSII photochemistry ( F v /F m ) on plants in the field in cool weather. Superior accessions were selected for further phenotyping: plants were grown at 25°C, transferred to 10°C (chilling) for 15 days, and returned to 25°C for 7 days (recovery). Two experiments assessed: (a) light‐saturated net photosynthetic rate ( A sat ) and operating quantum yield of PSII photochemistry (Φ PSII ), (b) response of net leaf CO 2 uptake ( A ) to intercellular [CO 2 ] ( c i ). Three accessions showed superior chilling tolerance: RU2012‐069 and RU2012‐114 achieved A sat up to double that of M. x giganteus prior to and during chilling, due to increased c i ‐ saturated photosynthesis ( V max ). RU2012‐069 and RU2012‐114 also maintained greater levels of Φ PSII during chilling, indicating reduced photodamage. Additionally, accession RU2012‐112 maintained a stable A sat throughout the 15‐day chilling period, while A sat continuously declined in other accessions; this suggests RU2012‐112 could outperform others in lengthy chilling periods. Plants were returned to 25°C after the chilling period; M. x giganteus showed the weakest recovery after 1 day, but a strong recovery after 1 week. This study has therefore identified important genetic resources for the synthesis of improved lines of M. x giganteus , which could facilitate the displacement of fossil fuels by cellulosic bioenergy.},
doi = {10.1111/gcbb.12599},
journal = {Global Change Biology. Bioenergy},
number = 7,
volume = 11,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {2019},
month = {2}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
https://doi.org/10.1111/gcbb.12599

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