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Title: Reimagining the potential of Earth observations for ecosystem service assessments

Abstract

The benefits nature provides to people, called ecosystem services, are increasingly recognized and accounted for in assessments of infrastructure development, agricultural management, conservation prioritization, and sustainable sourcing. These assessments are often limited by data, however, a gap with tremendous potential to be filled through Earth observations (EO), which produce a variety of data across spatial and temporal extents and resolutions. Despite widespread recognition of this potential, in practice few ecosystem service studies use EO. Here, we identify challenges and opportunities to using EO in ecosystem service modeling and assessment. Some challenges are technical, related to data awareness, processing, and access. These challenges require systematic investment in model platforms and data management. Other challenges are more conceptual but still systemic; they are byproducts of the structure of existing ecosystem service models and addressing them requires scientific investment in solutions and tools applicable to a wide range of models and approaches. We also highlight new ways in which EO can be leveraged for ecosystem service assessments, identifying promising new areas of research. More widespread use of EO for ecosystem service assessment will only be achieved if all of these types of challenges are addressed. Furthermore, this will require non-traditional funding and partneringmore » opportunities from private and public agencies to promote data exploration, sharing, and archiving. Investing in this integration will be reflected in better and more accurate ecosystem service assessments worldwide.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [2];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10];  [3];  [11];  [12];  [13];  [14];  [15];  [16];  [17] more »; ORCiD logo [18];  [19]; ORCiD logo [20]; ORCiD logo [21];  [3];  [22];  [23] « less
  1. Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States)
  2. Stanford Univ., CA (United States)
  3. Univ. of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States)
  4. Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States)
  5. Univ. of California, La Jolla, San Diego, CA (United States). Scripps Inst. of Oceanography
  6. The George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)
  7. U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)
  8. The Woods Hole Research Center, Falmouth, MA (United States)
  9. UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, Leipzig (Germany)
  10. Univ. of Minnesota, Twin Cities, St. Paul, MN (United States)
  11. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
  12. Stanford Univ. Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford, CA (United States)
  13. Univ. of South Florida, Saint Petersburg, FL (United States)
  14. Upstream Tech, Alameda, CA (United States)
  15. Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)
  16. Univ. of Florida, Davie, FL (United States)
  17. McGill Univ., Bellevue, QC (Canada)
  18. McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada)
  19. Univ. of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN (United States); Rainforest Alliance, New York, NY (United States)
  20. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  21. Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)
  22. Sewanee, Univ. of the South, Sewanee, TN (United States)
  23. Conservation Intl., Arlington, VA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1495934
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Science of the Total Environment
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 665; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0048-9697
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Ecosystem benefits; Remote sensing; Monitoring; Research priorities

Citation Formats

Ramirez-Reyes, Carlos, Brauman, Kate A., Chaplin-Kramer, Rebecca, Galford, Gillian L., Adamo, Susana B., Anderson, Christopher B., Anderson, Clarissa, Allington, Ginger R. H., Bagstad, Kenneth J., Coe, Michael T., Cord, Anna F., Dee, Laura E., Gould, Rachelle K., Jain, Meha, Kowal, Virginia A., Muller-Karger, Frank E., Norriss, Jessica, Potapov, Peter, Qiu, Jiangxiao, Rieb, Jesse T., Robinson, Brian E., Samberg, Leah H., Singh, Nagendra, Szeto, Sabrina H., Voigt, Brian, Watson, Keri, and Wright, T. Maxwell. Reimagining the potential of Earth observations for ecosystem service assessments. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.02.150.
Ramirez-Reyes, Carlos, Brauman, Kate A., Chaplin-Kramer, Rebecca, Galford, Gillian L., Adamo, Susana B., Anderson, Christopher B., Anderson, Clarissa, Allington, Ginger R. H., Bagstad, Kenneth J., Coe, Michael T., Cord, Anna F., Dee, Laura E., Gould, Rachelle K., Jain, Meha, Kowal, Virginia A., Muller-Karger, Frank E., Norriss, Jessica, Potapov, Peter, Qiu, Jiangxiao, Rieb, Jesse T., Robinson, Brian E., Samberg, Leah H., Singh, Nagendra, Szeto, Sabrina H., Voigt, Brian, Watson, Keri, & Wright, T. Maxwell. Reimagining the potential of Earth observations for ecosystem service assessments. United States. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.02.150.
Ramirez-Reyes, Carlos, Brauman, Kate A., Chaplin-Kramer, Rebecca, Galford, Gillian L., Adamo, Susana B., Anderson, Christopher B., Anderson, Clarissa, Allington, Ginger R. H., Bagstad, Kenneth J., Coe, Michael T., Cord, Anna F., Dee, Laura E., Gould, Rachelle K., Jain, Meha, Kowal, Virginia A., Muller-Karger, Frank E., Norriss, Jessica, Potapov, Peter, Qiu, Jiangxiao, Rieb, Jesse T., Robinson, Brian E., Samberg, Leah H., Singh, Nagendra, Szeto, Sabrina H., Voigt, Brian, Watson, Keri, and Wright, T. Maxwell. Tue . "Reimagining the potential of Earth observations for ecosystem service assessments". United States. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.02.150. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1495934.
@article{osti_1495934,
title = {Reimagining the potential of Earth observations for ecosystem service assessments},
author = {Ramirez-Reyes, Carlos and Brauman, Kate A. and Chaplin-Kramer, Rebecca and Galford, Gillian L. and Adamo, Susana B. and Anderson, Christopher B. and Anderson, Clarissa and Allington, Ginger R. H. and Bagstad, Kenneth J. and Coe, Michael T. and Cord, Anna F. and Dee, Laura E. and Gould, Rachelle K. and Jain, Meha and Kowal, Virginia A. and Muller-Karger, Frank E. and Norriss, Jessica and Potapov, Peter and Qiu, Jiangxiao and Rieb, Jesse T. and Robinson, Brian E. and Samberg, Leah H. and Singh, Nagendra and Szeto, Sabrina H. and Voigt, Brian and Watson, Keri and Wright, T. Maxwell},
abstractNote = {The benefits nature provides to people, called ecosystem services, are increasingly recognized and accounted for in assessments of infrastructure development, agricultural management, conservation prioritization, and sustainable sourcing. These assessments are often limited by data, however, a gap with tremendous potential to be filled through Earth observations (EO), which produce a variety of data across spatial and temporal extents and resolutions. Despite widespread recognition of this potential, in practice few ecosystem service studies use EO. Here, we identify challenges and opportunities to using EO in ecosystem service modeling and assessment. Some challenges are technical, related to data awareness, processing, and access. These challenges require systematic investment in model platforms and data management. Other challenges are more conceptual but still systemic; they are byproducts of the structure of existing ecosystem service models and addressing them requires scientific investment in solutions and tools applicable to a wide range of models and approaches. We also highlight new ways in which EO can be leveraged for ecosystem service assessments, identifying promising new areas of research. More widespread use of EO for ecosystem service assessment will only be achieved if all of these types of challenges are addressed. Furthermore, this will require non-traditional funding and partnering opportunities from private and public agencies to promote data exploration, sharing, and archiving. Investing in this integration will be reflected in better and more accurate ecosystem service assessments worldwide.},
doi = {10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.02.150},
journal = {Science of the Total Environment},
number = C,
volume = 665,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {2}
}

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