skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Implementation of a Faraday rotation diagnostic at the OMEGA laser facility

Abstract

Magnetic field measurements in turbulent plasmas are often difficult to perform. Here we show that for$${\geqslant}$$kG magnetic fields, a time-resolved Faraday rotation measurement can be made at the OMEGA laser facility. This diagnostic has been implemented using the Thomson scattering probe beam and the resultant path-integrated magnetic field has been compared with that of proton radiography. As a result, accurate measurement of magnetic fields is essential for satisfying the scientific goals of many current laser–plasma experiments.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [2];  [4]
  1. Univ. of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)
  2. Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)
  3. Univ. of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)
  4. Univ. of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)
  5. Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1495715
Grant/Contract Number:  
NA0002724
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
High Power Laser Science and Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 2095-4719
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; alignment; controls; diagnostics; high energy density physics; high power laser; laser–plasma interaction

Citation Formats

Rigby, Alexandria, Katz, J., Bott, A. F. A., White, T. G., Tzeferacos, P., Lamb, D. Q., Froula, D. H., and Gregori, G. Implementation of a Faraday rotation diagnostic at the OMEGA laser facility. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1017/hpl.2018.42.
Rigby, Alexandria, Katz, J., Bott, A. F. A., White, T. G., Tzeferacos, P., Lamb, D. Q., Froula, D. H., & Gregori, G. Implementation of a Faraday rotation diagnostic at the OMEGA laser facility. United States. doi:10.1017/hpl.2018.42.
Rigby, Alexandria, Katz, J., Bott, A. F. A., White, T. G., Tzeferacos, P., Lamb, D. Q., Froula, D. H., and Gregori, G. Mon . "Implementation of a Faraday rotation diagnostic at the OMEGA laser facility". United States. doi:10.1017/hpl.2018.42. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1495715.
@article{osti_1495715,
title = {Implementation of a Faraday rotation diagnostic at the OMEGA laser facility},
author = {Rigby, Alexandria and Katz, J. and Bott, A. F. A. and White, T. G. and Tzeferacos, P. and Lamb, D. Q. and Froula, D. H. and Gregori, G.},
abstractNote = {Magnetic field measurements in turbulent plasmas are often difficult to perform. Here we show that for${\geqslant}$kG magnetic fields, a time-resolved Faraday rotation measurement can be made at the OMEGA laser facility. This diagnostic has been implemented using the Thomson scattering probe beam and the resultant path-integrated magnetic field has been compared with that of proton radiography. As a result, accurate measurement of magnetic fields is essential for satisfying the scientific goals of many current laser–plasma experiments.},
doi = {10.1017/hpl.2018.42},
journal = {High Power Laser Science and Engineering},
number = ,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {8}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1 work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Figures / Tables:

Figure 1 Figure 1: Experimental setup. (a) In this experiment, two 6% chlorine-doped plastic foils, separated by 8 mm, were each irradiated with 351 nm, 5 kJ drive lasers in either a 5 or 10 ns pulse. This generated two counter-propagating plasma flows, each of which then passed through a plastic gridmore » with 300 µm hole width and hole spacing, and collided with one another at ∼25 ns after the start of the laser drive. The velocity of these flows prior to their collisions is ∼200 km · s−1. Additional 17 laser beams are fired simultaneously to implode a 420 µm diameter capsule consisting of a 2 µm SiO2 shell filled with D2 gas at 6 atm and 3He at 12 atm. The implosion produces mono-energetic protons at 3.3 and 15 MeV which traverse the plasma and are then collected by a CR-39 nuclear track detector[. Thomson scattering (TS) uses a 30 J, 1 ns, frequency doubled laser beam to probe the plasma on the axis of the flow, 400 µm from the center in a 50 µm focal spot toward grid B. The scattered light is collected with 63 scattering angle and the geometry is such that the scattering wavenumber is parallel to the axis of the flow. (b) Radiative hydrodynamic simulations using the code FLASH predict the electron density 36 ns after the start of the laser pulse and show the interaction region where the two jets have collided. Both proton radiography and Faraday rotation are path-integrated measurements. The proton radiography path length, LPR, is equal to the scale length of the electron density, in this case 0.6 mm. The Faraday rotation path length, LFR, is longer than that of proton radiography since the Thomson scattering region lies on the opposing side from which the probe beam originates and so passes through the interaction region (where the density is larger) twice. Consequently, in this experiment, the Faraday rotation path length LFR = 2LPR. (c) Electron density along the TS beam path, from FLASH simulations. The electron density increases as the beam passes through the jet-interaction region.« less

Save / Share:

Works referenced in this record:

Extensible component-based architecture for FLASH, a massively parallel, multiphysics simulation code
journal, October 2009


The magnetic power spectrum in Faraday rotation screens
journal, April 2003


Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments aiming to demonstrate magnetic field amplification via turbulent dynamo
journal, April 2017

  • Tzeferacos, P.; Rigby, A.; Bott, A.
  • Physics of Plasmas, Vol. 24, Issue 4
  • DOI: 10.1063/1.4978628

FLASH: An Adaptive Mesh Hydrodynamics Code for Modeling Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes
journal, November 2000

  • Fryxell, B.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P.
  • The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series, Vol. 131, Issue 1
  • DOI: 10.1086/317361

Design, construction, and calibration of a three-axis, high-frequency magnetic probe (B-dot probe) as a diagnostic for exploding plasmas
journal, November 2009

  • Everson, E. T.; Pribyl, P.; Constantin, C. G.
  • Review of Scientific Instruments, Vol. 80, Issue 11
  • DOI: 10.1063/1.3246785

Developed turbulence and nonlinear amplification of magnetic fields in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas
journal, June 2015

  • Meinecke, Jena; Tzeferacos, Petros; Bell, Anthony
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 112, Issue 27
  • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1502079112

Laboratory evidence of dynamo amplification of magnetic fields in a turbulent plasma
journal, February 2018


Diagnosing collisions of magnetized, high energy density plasma flows using a combination of collective Thomson scattering, Faraday rotation, and interferometry (invited)
journal, November 2014

  • Swadling, G. F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Hall, G. N.
  • Review of Scientific Instruments, Vol. 85, Issue 11
  • DOI: 10.1063/1.4890564

Laser light scattering in laboratory plasmas
journal, January 1969


Measuring Implosion Dynamics through ρ R Evolution in Inertial-Confinement Fusion Experiments
journal, March 2003


Source characterization and modeling development for monoenergetic-proton radiography experiments on OMEGA
journal, June 2012

  • Manuel, M. J. -E.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.
  • Review of Scientific Instruments, Vol. 83, Issue 6
  • DOI: 10.1063/1.4730336

Polarimetry diagnostic on OMEGA EP using a 10-ps, 263-nm probe beam
journal, November 2014

  • Davies, A.; Haberberger, D.; Boni, R.
  • Review of Scientific Instruments, Vol. 85, Issue 11
  • DOI: 10.1063/1.4889908

Proton imaging of stochastic magnetic fields
journal, December 2017


Quantitative shadowgraphy and proton radiography for large intensity modulations
journal, February 2017


FLASH MHD simulations of experiments that study shock-generated magnetic fields
journal, December 2015