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Title: High-Energy-Resolution Resonant Inelastic (Hard) X-ray Scattering (RIXS) at the Advanced Photon Source

Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) is a powerful technique for studying electronic excitations in a wide variety of complex materials and environments with momentum-, energy- and potentially polarization resolution. Since its inception, the development of RIXS instrumentation and scientific subjects of study have benefited from a closely intertwined evolution; improvements in energy resolution and throughput, spurred by specific scientific cases, have in turn made new subjects of study feasible. Early RIXS work in the late 1990s was aimed at the study of charge transfer excitations in transition metal oxides (TMO), including the high-Tc superconducting Cuprates, the Nickelates and Manganites, in which the lowest lying excitations across the optical gap at a few eV from the elastic line could be accessed. As the understanding of strongly correlated electron systems progressed, scientific inquiries were directed towards the orbital degrees of freedom: in many Mott insulators the crystal field splits the degeneracy of the active d-orbitals, and the transitions between levels, the dd excitations, generate spectral features at energy losses of <2 eV. These features could reliably be observed with the state-of-the-art resolution at the time of 100-200 meV. In 2008, a ground-breaking paper appeared, that established RIXS as a probe of magneticmore » excitations. Magnetism and magnetic ordering are central questions in the study of correlated electron systems, however associated spectral features (“magnons”) lie at a fraction of an eV or even in the sub-10meV regime. A significant advance in energy resolution was necessary to study pressing scientific subjects, including magnetic excitations, in the newly discovered Iridate systems. Also, in 2011 a comprehensive review of the RIXS technique was published, which coined the terms “direct RIXS" and “indirect RIXS" and suggested that, for transition metal compounds, RIXS is most productive when employed at L-absorption edges. Thus, research assignments were divided between the soft- x-ray and hard x-ray communities according to L-edge energies: compounds with 3-d elements to the soft, compounds with 5-d elements to the hard x-ray side and other elements somewhere in-between.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1] ;  [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Synchrotron Radiation News
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0894-0886
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Research Org:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS
OSTI Identifier:
1493893

Kim, Jungho, Casa, D. M., Upton, M. H., Toellner, T. S., Said, A. H., and Gog, T.. High-Energy-Resolution Resonant Inelastic (Hard) X-ray Scattering (RIXS) at the Advanced Photon Source. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1080/08940886.2018.1435950.
Kim, Jungho, Casa, D. M., Upton, M. H., Toellner, T. S., Said, A. H., & Gog, T.. High-Energy-Resolution Resonant Inelastic (Hard) X-ray Scattering (RIXS) at the Advanced Photon Source. United States. doi:10.1080/08940886.2018.1435950.
Kim, Jungho, Casa, D. M., Upton, M. H., Toellner, T. S., Said, A. H., and Gog, T.. 2018. "High-Energy-Resolution Resonant Inelastic (Hard) X-ray Scattering (RIXS) at the Advanced Photon Source". United States. doi:10.1080/08940886.2018.1435950. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1493893.
@article{osti_1493893,
title = {High-Energy-Resolution Resonant Inelastic (Hard) X-ray Scattering (RIXS) at the Advanced Photon Source},
author = {Kim, Jungho and Casa, D. M. and Upton, M. H. and Toellner, T. S. and Said, A. H. and Gog, T.},
abstractNote = {Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) is a powerful technique for studying electronic excitations in a wide variety of complex materials and environments with momentum-, energy- and potentially polarization resolution. Since its inception, the development of RIXS instrumentation and scientific subjects of study have benefited from a closely intertwined evolution; improvements in energy resolution and throughput, spurred by specific scientific cases, have in turn made new subjects of study feasible. Early RIXS work in the late 1990s was aimed at the study of charge transfer excitations in transition metal oxides (TMO), including the high-Tc superconducting Cuprates, the Nickelates and Manganites, in which the lowest lying excitations across the optical gap at a few eV from the elastic line could be accessed. As the understanding of strongly correlated electron systems progressed, scientific inquiries were directed towards the orbital degrees of freedom: in many Mott insulators the crystal field splits the degeneracy of the active d-orbitals, and the transitions between levels, the dd excitations, generate spectral features at energy losses of <2 eV. These features could reliably be observed with the state-of-the-art resolution at the time of 100-200 meV. In 2008, a ground-breaking paper appeared, that established RIXS as a probe of magnetic excitations. Magnetism and magnetic ordering are central questions in the study of correlated electron systems, however associated spectral features (“magnons”) lie at a fraction of an eV or even in the sub-10meV regime. A significant advance in energy resolution was necessary to study pressing scientific subjects, including magnetic excitations, in the newly discovered Iridate systems. Also, in 2011 a comprehensive review of the RIXS technique was published, which coined the terms “direct RIXS" and “indirect RIXS" and suggested that, for transition metal compounds, RIXS is most productive when employed at L-absorption edges. Thus, research assignments were divided between the soft- x-ray and hard x-ray communities according to L-edge energies: compounds with 3-d elements to the soft, compounds with 5-d elements to the hard x-ray side and other elements somewhere in-between.},
doi = {10.1080/08940886.2018.1435950},
journal = {Synchrotron Radiation News},
number = 2,
volume = 31,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}