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Title: Adsorption of selenite onto Bacillus subtilis: the overlooked role of cell envelope sulfhydryl sites in the microbial conversion of Se(IV)

Abstract

Microbial activities play a central role in the global cycling of selenium. Microorganisms can reduce, methylate and assimilate Se, controlling the transport and fate of Se in the environment. However, the mechanisms controlling these microbial activities are still poorly understood. In particular, it is unknown how the negatively-charged Se(IV) and Se(VI) oxyanions that dominate the aqueous Se speciation in oxidizing environments bind to negatively-charged microbial cell surfaces in order to become bioavailable. Here, we show that the adsorption of selenite onto Bacillus subtilis bacterial cells is controlled by cell envelope sulfhydryl sites. Once adsorbed onto the bacteria, selenite is reduced, and forms reduced organo-Se compounds (e.g., R1S-Se-SR2). Because sulfhydryl sites are present within cell envelopes of a wide range of bacterial species, sulfhydryl-controlled adsorption of selenite likely represents a general mechanism adopted by bacteria to make selenite bioavailable. Therefore, sulfhydryl binding of selenite likely occurs in a wide range of oxidized Se-bearing environments, and because it is followed by microbial conversion of selenite to other Se species, the process represents a crucial step in the global cycling of Se.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences
  2. Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of Chemical Engineering; Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Biosciences Division
  3. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Biosciences Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1493698
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 52; Journal Issue: 18; Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Yu, Qiang, Boyanov, Maxim I., Liu, Jinling, Kemner, Kenneth M., and Fein, Jeremy B. Adsorption of selenite onto Bacillus subtilis: the overlooked role of cell envelope sulfhydryl sites in the microbial conversion of Se(IV). United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.est.8b02280.
Yu, Qiang, Boyanov, Maxim I., Liu, Jinling, Kemner, Kenneth M., & Fein, Jeremy B. Adsorption of selenite onto Bacillus subtilis: the overlooked role of cell envelope sulfhydryl sites in the microbial conversion of Se(IV). United States. doi:10.1021/acs.est.8b02280.
Yu, Qiang, Boyanov, Maxim I., Liu, Jinling, Kemner, Kenneth M., and Fein, Jeremy B. Tue . "Adsorption of selenite onto Bacillus subtilis: the overlooked role of cell envelope sulfhydryl sites in the microbial conversion of Se(IV)". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.est.8b02280. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1493698.
@article{osti_1493698,
title = {Adsorption of selenite onto Bacillus subtilis: the overlooked role of cell envelope sulfhydryl sites in the microbial conversion of Se(IV)},
author = {Yu, Qiang and Boyanov, Maxim I. and Liu, Jinling and Kemner, Kenneth M. and Fein, Jeremy B.},
abstractNote = {Microbial activities play a central role in the global cycling of selenium. Microorganisms can reduce, methylate and assimilate Se, controlling the transport and fate of Se in the environment. However, the mechanisms controlling these microbial activities are still poorly understood. In particular, it is unknown how the negatively-charged Se(IV) and Se(VI) oxyanions that dominate the aqueous Se speciation in oxidizing environments bind to negatively-charged microbial cell surfaces in order to become bioavailable. Here, we show that the adsorption of selenite onto Bacillus subtilis bacterial cells is controlled by cell envelope sulfhydryl sites. Once adsorbed onto the bacteria, selenite is reduced, and forms reduced organo-Se compounds (e.g., R1S-Se-SR2). Because sulfhydryl sites are present within cell envelopes of a wide range of bacterial species, sulfhydryl-controlled adsorption of selenite likely represents a general mechanism adopted by bacteria to make selenite bioavailable. Therefore, sulfhydryl binding of selenite likely occurs in a wide range of oxidized Se-bearing environments, and because it is followed by microbial conversion of selenite to other Se species, the process represents a crucial step in the global cycling of Se.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.est.8b02280},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 18,
volume = 52,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}

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