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Title: CO 2 Capture via Crystalline Hydrogen-Bonded Bicarbonate Dimers

Abstract

Human activities in the last one and a half centuries have perturbed the natural carbon cycle, shifting massive amounts of carbon from the geosphere into the atmosphere and leading to climate change at an unprecedented pace. Carbon capture and storage, consisting of capturing CO 2 from fossil fuel emissions and sequestering it deep underground, offer the prospect of limiting the increase in the atmospheric CO 2 concentration and the global temperature. This requires the development and large-scale deployment of energy-efficient carbon-capture technologies. Here, we demonstrate a promising approach to CO 2 capture based on crystallization of bicarbonate-water clusters with a simple guanidine compound. Furthermore, the CO 2 separation cycle involves a unique proton-transfer mechanism via the formation of a carbonic acid dimer, leading to efficient CO 2 release and quantitative regeneration of the guanidine compound and requiring significantly less energy than state-of-the-art carbon-capture technologies.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1493130
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Chem
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 2451-9294
Publisher:
Cell Press, Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; carbon capture; carbonic acid; crystallization; guanidine; hydrogen bonding; anion clusters

Citation Formats

Williams, Neil J., Seipp, Charles A., Brethomé, Flavien M., Ma, Ying -Zhong, Ivanov, Alexander S., Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S., Kidder, Michelle K., Martin, Halie J., Holguin, Erick, Garrabrant, Kathleen A., and Custelcean, Radu. CO2 Capture via Crystalline Hydrogen-Bonded Bicarbonate Dimers. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1016/j.chempr.2018.12.025.
Williams, Neil J., Seipp, Charles A., Brethomé, Flavien M., Ma, Ying -Zhong, Ivanov, Alexander S., Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S., Kidder, Michelle K., Martin, Halie J., Holguin, Erick, Garrabrant, Kathleen A., & Custelcean, Radu. CO2 Capture via Crystalline Hydrogen-Bonded Bicarbonate Dimers. United States. doi:10.1016/j.chempr.2018.12.025.
Williams, Neil J., Seipp, Charles A., Brethomé, Flavien M., Ma, Ying -Zhong, Ivanov, Alexander S., Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S., Kidder, Michelle K., Martin, Halie J., Holguin, Erick, Garrabrant, Kathleen A., and Custelcean, Radu. Thu . "CO2 Capture via Crystalline Hydrogen-Bonded Bicarbonate Dimers". United States. doi:10.1016/j.chempr.2018.12.025.
@article{osti_1493130,
title = {CO2 Capture via Crystalline Hydrogen-Bonded Bicarbonate Dimers},
author = {Williams, Neil J. and Seipp, Charles A. and Brethomé, Flavien M. and Ma, Ying -Zhong and Ivanov, Alexander S. and Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S. and Kidder, Michelle K. and Martin, Halie J. and Holguin, Erick and Garrabrant, Kathleen A. and Custelcean, Radu},
abstractNote = {Human activities in the last one and a half centuries have perturbed the natural carbon cycle, shifting massive amounts of carbon from the geosphere into the atmosphere and leading to climate change at an unprecedented pace. Carbon capture and storage, consisting of capturing CO2 from fossil fuel emissions and sequestering it deep underground, offer the prospect of limiting the increase in the atmospheric CO2 concentration and the global temperature. This requires the development and large-scale deployment of energy-efficient carbon-capture technologies. Here, we demonstrate a promising approach to CO2 capture based on crystallization of bicarbonate-water clusters with a simple guanidine compound. Furthermore, the CO2 separation cycle involves a unique proton-transfer mechanism via the formation of a carbonic acid dimer, leading to efficient CO2 release and quantitative regeneration of the guanidine compound and requiring significantly less energy than state-of-the-art carbon-capture technologies.},
doi = {10.1016/j.chempr.2018.12.025},
journal = {Chem},
number = ,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {1}
}

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This content will become publicly available on January 31, 2020
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