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Title: Application of cloud microphysics to NCAR community climate model

Abstract

Here, the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System bulk cloud microphysics parameterization has been applied to the treatment of stratiform clouds in the National Center for Atmospheric Research community climate model. Predicted cloud properties are mass concentrations of cloud water, cloud ice, rain, and snow and number concentration of ice. Microphysical processes treated include condensation of water vapor and evaporation of cloud water and rain, nucleation of ice crystals, vapor deposition and sublimation of cloud ice and snow, autoconversion and accretion of cloud water, aggregation and collection of cloud ice, melting of ice and snow, riming on ice and snow, and gravitational settling of ice, rain, and snow. Although the parameterization is more detailed and hence more computationally demanding than other cloud microphysics parameterizations in climate models, it treats the Bergeron-Findeisen process explicitly and hence does not require an ad hoc parameterization to distinguish liquid water and ice. A variety of simulations were performed, testing sensitivity to horizontal and vertical resolution, the treatment of ice number, droplet number, and parameterization of cumulus convection. Lastly, the simulated planetary radiation balance is found to be particularly sensitive to the treatment of ice number and cumulus convection.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  2. Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1492424
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-28034
Journal ID: ISSN 0148-0227
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 102; Journal Issue: D14; Journal ID: ISSN 0148-0227
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; climatology; cloud physics and chemistry; theoretical modeling

Citation Formats

Ghan, Steven J., Leung, L. Ruby, and Hu, Qi. Application of cloud microphysics to NCAR community climate model. United States: N. p., 1997. Web. doi:10.1029/97JD00703.
Ghan, Steven J., Leung, L. Ruby, & Hu, Qi. Application of cloud microphysics to NCAR community climate model. United States. doi:10.1029/97JD00703.
Ghan, Steven J., Leung, L. Ruby, and Hu, Qi. Tue . "Application of cloud microphysics to NCAR community climate model". United States. doi:10.1029/97JD00703. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1492424.
@article{osti_1492424,
title = {Application of cloud microphysics to NCAR community climate model},
author = {Ghan, Steven J. and Leung, L. Ruby and Hu, Qi},
abstractNote = {Here, the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System bulk cloud microphysics parameterization has been applied to the treatment of stratiform clouds in the National Center for Atmospheric Research community climate model. Predicted cloud properties are mass concentrations of cloud water, cloud ice, rain, and snow and number concentration of ice. Microphysical processes treated include condensation of water vapor and evaporation of cloud water and rain, nucleation of ice crystals, vapor deposition and sublimation of cloud ice and snow, autoconversion and accretion of cloud water, aggregation and collection of cloud ice, melting of ice and snow, riming on ice and snow, and gravitational settling of ice, rain, and snow. Although the parameterization is more detailed and hence more computationally demanding than other cloud microphysics parameterizations in climate models, it treats the Bergeron-Findeisen process explicitly and hence does not require an ad hoc parameterization to distinguish liquid water and ice. A variety of simulations were performed, testing sensitivity to horizontal and vertical resolution, the treatment of ice number, droplet number, and parameterization of cumulus convection. Lastly, the simulated planetary radiation balance is found to be particularly sensitive to the treatment of ice number and cumulus convection.},
doi = {10.1029/97JD00703},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research},
number = D14,
volume = 102,
place = {United States},
year = {1997},
month = {7}
}

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Cited by: 39 works
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