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Title: Litters of self-replicating origami cross-tiles

Abstract

Self-replication and exponential growth are ubiquitous in nature but until recently there were few examples of artificial self-replication. Often replication is a templated process where a parent produces a single offspring, doubling the population in each generation. Many species however produce more than one offspring at a time, enabling faster population growth and higher probability of species perpetuation. We have made a system of cross-shaped origami tiles that yields a number of offspring, four to eight or more, depending on the concentration of monomer units to be assembled. The parent dimer template serves as a seed to crystallize a one-dimensional crystal, a ladder. The ladder rungs are then UV–cross-linked and the offspring are then released by heating, to yield a litter of autonomous daughters. In the complement study, we also optimize the growth conditions to speed up the process and yield a 10 3 increase in the growth rate for the single-offspring replication system. Self-replication and exponential growth of autonomous motifs is useful for fundamental studies of selection and evolution as well as for materials design, fabrication, and directed evolution. Methods that increase the growth rate, the primary evolutionary drive, not only speed up experiments but provide additional mechanisms formore » evolving materials toward desired functionalities.« less

Authors:
; ORCiD logo; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1491910
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0007991; SC0000989
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America Journal Volume: 116 Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 0027-8424
Publisher:
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Zhuo, Rebecca, Zhou, Feng, He, Xiaojin, Sha, Ruojie, Seeman, Nadrian C., and Chaikin, Paul M. Litters of self-replicating origami cross-tiles. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.1812793116.
Zhuo, Rebecca, Zhou, Feng, He, Xiaojin, Sha, Ruojie, Seeman, Nadrian C., & Chaikin, Paul M. Litters of self-replicating origami cross-tiles. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1812793116.
Zhuo, Rebecca, Zhou, Feng, He, Xiaojin, Sha, Ruojie, Seeman, Nadrian C., and Chaikin, Paul M. Wed . "Litters of self-replicating origami cross-tiles". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1812793116.
@article{osti_1491910,
title = {Litters of self-replicating origami cross-tiles},
author = {Zhuo, Rebecca and Zhou, Feng and He, Xiaojin and Sha, Ruojie and Seeman, Nadrian C. and Chaikin, Paul M.},
abstractNote = {Self-replication and exponential growth are ubiquitous in nature but until recently there were few examples of artificial self-replication. Often replication is a templated process where a parent produces a single offspring, doubling the population in each generation. Many species however produce more than one offspring at a time, enabling faster population growth and higher probability of species perpetuation. We have made a system of cross-shaped origami tiles that yields a number of offspring, four to eight or more, depending on the concentration of monomer units to be assembled. The parent dimer template serves as a seed to crystallize a one-dimensional crystal, a ladder. The ladder rungs are then UV–cross-linked and the offspring are then released by heating, to yield a litter of autonomous daughters. In the complement study, we also optimize the growth conditions to speed up the process and yield a 10 3 increase in the growth rate for the single-offspring replication system. Self-replication and exponential growth of autonomous motifs is useful for fundamental studies of selection and evolution as well as for materials design, fabrication, and directed evolution. Methods that increase the growth rate, the primary evolutionary drive, not only speed up experiments but provide additional mechanisms for evolving materials toward desired functionalities.},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.1812793116},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
number = 6,
volume = 116,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {1}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1812793116

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Works referenced in this record:

Folding DNA to create nanoscale shapes and patterns
journal, March 2006