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Title: Nanocomposite Coatings with Tunable Properties Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition

Abstract

We report that nanocomposite coatings, comprised of a precisely blended mixture of components, have diverse applications in microelectronics, optics, sensors, and solid-state detectors. By varying the composition of the mixture, the electrical, optical, and physical properties of the coatings can be “tuned” over almost the full range of the individual components, and can sometimes yield properties distinct from those of any of the constituents. There are many techniques for producing nanocomposite coatings, but atomic layer deposition (ALD) is particularly well suited for controlling the properties of the fabricated coatings. ALD uses alternating cycles of gaseous precursors to a solid surface to deposit materials in an atomic layer-by-layer fashion. Because a chemical reaction on the surface naturally terminates when the surface functional groups are all reacted, the amount of material deposited in one ALD cycle is easily controlled. This self-limiting property, coupled with facile diffusion of the precursor vapors into narrow pores and voids, allows complex, 3-dimensional substrates to be coated with excellent uniformity and conformality. ALD can be used to deposit a wide variety of materials including metal oxides, nitrides, sulfides, and even pure elements. By alternating between two materials (e.g., a metal and a metal oxide), we can synthesizemore » complex nanocomposite coatings. Lastly, the thickness of the coating is controlled by the total number of ALD cycles performed, and the composition is controlled by the ratio of the ALD cycles executed for each of the two components.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25); U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) - Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)
OSTI Identifier:
1491818
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Material Matters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 13; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1933-9631
Publisher:
Sigma-Aldrich
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Elam, Jeffrey W., and Mane, Anil U. Nanocomposite Coatings with Tunable Properties Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition. United States: N. p., 2018. Web.
Elam, Jeffrey W., & Mane, Anil U. Nanocomposite Coatings with Tunable Properties Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition. United States.
Elam, Jeffrey W., and Mane, Anil U. Mon . "Nanocomposite Coatings with Tunable Properties Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1491818.
@article{osti_1491818,
title = {Nanocomposite Coatings with Tunable Properties Prepared by Atomic Layer Deposition},
author = {Elam, Jeffrey W. and Mane, Anil U.},
abstractNote = {We report that nanocomposite coatings, comprised of a precisely blended mixture of components, have diverse applications in microelectronics, optics, sensors, and solid-state detectors. By varying the composition of the mixture, the electrical, optical, and physical properties of the coatings can be “tuned” over almost the full range of the individual components, and can sometimes yield properties distinct from those of any of the constituents. There are many techniques for producing nanocomposite coatings, but atomic layer deposition (ALD) is particularly well suited for controlling the properties of the fabricated coatings. ALD uses alternating cycles of gaseous precursors to a solid surface to deposit materials in an atomic layer-by-layer fashion. Because a chemical reaction on the surface naturally terminates when the surface functional groups are all reacted, the amount of material deposited in one ALD cycle is easily controlled. This self-limiting property, coupled with facile diffusion of the precursor vapors into narrow pores and voids, allows complex, 3-dimensional substrates to be coated with excellent uniformity and conformality. ALD can be used to deposit a wide variety of materials including metal oxides, nitrides, sulfides, and even pure elements. By alternating between two materials (e.g., a metal and a metal oxide), we can synthesize complex nanocomposite coatings. Lastly, the thickness of the coating is controlled by the total number of ALD cycles performed, and the composition is controlled by the ratio of the ALD cycles executed for each of the two components.},
doi = {},
journal = {Material Matters},
number = 2,
volume = 13,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {1}
}

Journal Article:
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