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Title: Capillary spreading of contact line over a sinking sphere

Abstract

The contact line dynamics over a sinking solid sphere are investigated in comparison with classical spreading theories. Experimentally, high-speed imaging systems with optical light or x-ray illumination are employed to accurately measure the spreading motion and dynamic contact angle of the contact line. Millimetric spheres are controlled to descend with a constant speed ranging from 3.2 x 10 4 to 0.79 m/s. We observed three different spreading stages over a sinking sphere, which depends on the contact line velocity and contact angle. These stages consistently showed the characteristics of capillarity-driven spreading as the contact line spreads faster with a higher contact angle. The contact line velocity is observed to follow a classical capillary-viscous model at a higher Ohnesorge number (> 0.02). For the cases with a relatively low Ohnesorge number (< 0.02), the contact line velocity is significantly lower than the speed predicted by the capillary-viscous balance. This indicates the existence of an additional opposing force (inertia), which is a similar transition from capillary viscous to capillary-inertia balances found in drop-impact dynamics. Additionally, we observed the linear relation between the contact line velocity and the sphere sinking speed during the second stage, in which the contact line inertia is balancedmore » with the impact pressure by a sphere at high inertia regimes.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)
  2. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Science Foundation (NSF); USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1491706
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1395379
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 111; Journal Issue: 13; Journal ID: ISSN 0003-6951
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS

Citation Formats

Kim, Seong Jin, Fezzaa, Kamel, An, Jim, Sun, Tao, and Jung, Sunghwan. Capillary spreading of contact line over a sinking sphere. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4991361.
Kim, Seong Jin, Fezzaa, Kamel, An, Jim, Sun, Tao, & Jung, Sunghwan. Capillary spreading of contact line over a sinking sphere. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4991361.
Kim, Seong Jin, Fezzaa, Kamel, An, Jim, Sun, Tao, and Jung, Sunghwan. Mon . "Capillary spreading of contact line over a sinking sphere". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4991361. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1491706.
@article{osti_1491706,
title = {Capillary spreading of contact line over a sinking sphere},
author = {Kim, Seong Jin and Fezzaa, Kamel and An, Jim and Sun, Tao and Jung, Sunghwan},
abstractNote = {The contact line dynamics over a sinking solid sphere are investigated in comparison with classical spreading theories. Experimentally, high-speed imaging systems with optical light or x-ray illumination are employed to accurately measure the spreading motion and dynamic contact angle of the contact line. Millimetric spheres are controlled to descend with a constant speed ranging from 3.2 x 104 to 0.79 m/s. We observed three different spreading stages over a sinking sphere, which depends on the contact line velocity and contact angle. These stages consistently showed the characteristics of capillarity-driven spreading as the contact line spreads faster with a higher contact angle. The contact line velocity is observed to follow a classical capillary-viscous model at a higher Ohnesorge number (> 0.02). For the cases with a relatively low Ohnesorge number (< 0.02), the contact line velocity is significantly lower than the speed predicted by the capillary-viscous balance. This indicates the existence of an additional opposing force (inertia), which is a similar transition from capillary viscous to capillary-inertia balances found in drop-impact dynamics. Additionally, we observed the linear relation between the contact line velocity and the sphere sinking speed during the second stage, in which the contact line inertia is balanced with the impact pressure by a sphere at high inertia regimes.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4991361},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 13,
volume = 111,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {9}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

Wetting and Roughness
journal, August 2008


Self-Propelled Dropwise Condensate on Superhydrophobic Surfaces
journal, October 2009