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Title: Attachment between heterotrophic bacteria and microalgae influences symbiotic microscale interactions

Abstract

The surface and surroundings of microalgal cells (phycosphere) are critical interaction zones but have been difficult to functionally interrogate due to methodological limitations. In this study, we examined effects of phycosphere-associated bacteria for two biofuel-relevant microalgal species ( Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Nannochloropsis salina) using stable isotope tracing and high spatial resolution mass spectrometry imaging (NanoSIMS) to quantify elemental exchanges at the single-cell level. Each algal species responded differently to bacterial attachment. In P. tricornutum, a high percentage of cells had attached bacteria (92%–98%, up to eight bacteria per alga) and fixed 64% more carbon with attached bacteria compared to axenic cells. In contrast, N. salina cells were less commonly associated with bacteria (42%–63%), harboured fewer bacteria per alga, and fixed 10% more carbon without attached bacteria compared to axenic cells. Additionally, an uncultivated bacterium related to Haliscomenobacter sp. was identified as an effective mutualist; it increased carbon fixation when attached to P. tricornutum and incorporated 71% more algal-fixed carbon relative to other bacteria. Our results illustrate how phylogenetic identity and physical location of bacteria and algae facilitate diverse metabolic responses. Phycosphere-mediated, mutualistic chemical exchanges between autotrophs and heterotrophs may be a fruitful means to increase microalgal productivity for applied engineeringmore » efforts.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1491666
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1479114
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-731684
Journal ID: ISSN 1462-2912; 883071
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344; AC52‐07NA27344
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 20; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 1462-2912
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Samo, Ty J., Kimbrel, Jeffrey A., Nilson, Daniel J., Pett‐Ridge, Jennifer, Weber, Peter K., and Mayali, Xavier. Attachment between heterotrophic bacteria and microalgae influences symbiotic microscale interactions. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1111/1462-2920.14357.
Samo, Ty J., Kimbrel, Jeffrey A., Nilson, Daniel J., Pett‐Ridge, Jennifer, Weber, Peter K., & Mayali, Xavier. Attachment between heterotrophic bacteria and microalgae influences symbiotic microscale interactions. United States. doi:10.1111/1462-2920.14357.
Samo, Ty J., Kimbrel, Jeffrey A., Nilson, Daniel J., Pett‐Ridge, Jennifer, Weber, Peter K., and Mayali, Xavier. Wed . "Attachment between heterotrophic bacteria and microalgae influences symbiotic microscale interactions". United States. doi:10.1111/1462-2920.14357.
@article{osti_1491666,
title = {Attachment between heterotrophic bacteria and microalgae influences symbiotic microscale interactions},
author = {Samo, Ty J. and Kimbrel, Jeffrey A. and Nilson, Daniel J. and Pett‐Ridge, Jennifer and Weber, Peter K. and Mayali, Xavier},
abstractNote = {The surface and surroundings of microalgal cells (phycosphere) are critical interaction zones but have been difficult to functionally interrogate due to methodological limitations. In this study, we examined effects of phycosphere-associated bacteria for two biofuel-relevant microalgal species (Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Nannochloropsis salina) using stable isotope tracing and high spatial resolution mass spectrometry imaging (NanoSIMS) to quantify elemental exchanges at the single-cell level. Each algal species responded differently to bacterial attachment. In P. tricornutum, a high percentage of cells had attached bacteria (92%–98%, up to eight bacteria per alga) and fixed 64% more carbon with attached bacteria compared to axenic cells. In contrast, N. salina cells were less commonly associated with bacteria (42%–63%), harboured fewer bacteria per alga, and fixed 10% more carbon without attached bacteria compared to axenic cells. Additionally, an uncultivated bacterium related to Haliscomenobacter sp. was identified as an effective mutualist; it increased carbon fixation when attached to P. tricornutum and incorporated 71% more algal-fixed carbon relative to other bacteria. Our results illustrate how phylogenetic identity and physical location of bacteria and algae facilitate diverse metabolic responses. Phycosphere-mediated, mutualistic chemical exchanges between autotrophs and heterotrophs may be a fruitful means to increase microalgal productivity for applied engineering efforts.},
doi = {10.1111/1462-2920.14357},
journal = {Environmental Microbiology},
number = 12,
volume = 20,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {7}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

An Outlook on Microalgal Biofuels
journal, August 2010