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Title: Negative Additive Manufacturing of Complex Shaped Boron Carbides

Abstract

Boron carbide (B 4C) is one of the hardest materials in existence. However, this attractive property also limits its machineability into complex shapes for high wear, high hardness, and lightweight material applications such as armors. To overcome this challenge, negative additive manufacturing (AM) is employed to produce complex geometries of boron carbides at various length scales. Negative AM first involves gelcasting a suspension into a 3D-printed plastic mold. The mold is then dissolved away, leaving behind a green body as a negative copy. Resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) is used as a novel gelling agent because unlike traditional hydrogels, there is little to no shrinkage, which allows for extremely complex molds to be used. Furthermore, this gelling agent can be pyrolyzed to leave behind ~50 wt% carbon, which is a highly effective sintering aid for B 4C. Due to this highly homogenous distribution of in situ carbon within the B 4C matrix, less than 2% porosity can be achieved after sintering. This protocol highlights in detail the methodology for creating near fully dense boron carbide parts with highly complex geometries.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1491640
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-750634
Journal ID: ISSN 1940-087X; jove; 935230
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Visualized Experiments
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 139; Journal ID: ISSN 1940-087X
Publisher:
MyJoVE Corp.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Lu, Ryan, Miller, Dorothy J., Du Frane, Wyatt L., Chandrasekaran, Swetha, Landingham, Richard L., Worsley, Marcus A., and Kuntz, Joshua D. Negative Additive Manufacturing of Complex Shaped Boron Carbides. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.3791/58438.
Lu, Ryan, Miller, Dorothy J., Du Frane, Wyatt L., Chandrasekaran, Swetha, Landingham, Richard L., Worsley, Marcus A., & Kuntz, Joshua D. Negative Additive Manufacturing of Complex Shaped Boron Carbides. United States. doi:10.3791/58438.
Lu, Ryan, Miller, Dorothy J., Du Frane, Wyatt L., Chandrasekaran, Swetha, Landingham, Richard L., Worsley, Marcus A., and Kuntz, Joshua D. Tue . "Negative Additive Manufacturing of Complex Shaped Boron Carbides". United States. doi:10.3791/58438. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1491640.
@article{osti_1491640,
title = {Negative Additive Manufacturing of Complex Shaped Boron Carbides},
author = {Lu, Ryan and Miller, Dorothy J. and Du Frane, Wyatt L. and Chandrasekaran, Swetha and Landingham, Richard L. and Worsley, Marcus A. and Kuntz, Joshua D.},
abstractNote = {Boron carbide (B4C) is one of the hardest materials in existence. However, this attractive property also limits its machineability into complex shapes for high wear, high hardness, and lightweight material applications such as armors. To overcome this challenge, negative additive manufacturing (AM) is employed to produce complex geometries of boron carbides at various length scales. Negative AM first involves gelcasting a suspension into a 3D-printed plastic mold. The mold is then dissolved away, leaving behind a green body as a negative copy. Resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) is used as a novel gelling agent because unlike traditional hydrogels, there is little to no shrinkage, which allows for extremely complex molds to be used. Furthermore, this gelling agent can be pyrolyzed to leave behind ~50 wt% carbon, which is a highly effective sintering aid for B4C. Due to this highly homogenous distribution of in situ carbon within the B4C matrix, less than 2% porosity can be achieved after sintering. This protocol highlights in detail the methodology for creating near fully dense boron carbide parts with highly complex geometries.},
doi = {10.3791/58438},
journal = {Journal of Visualized Experiments},
number = ,
volume = 139,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}

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