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Title: Enhancing the Co-utilization of Biomass-Derived Mixed Sugars by Yeasts

Abstract

Plant biomass is a promising carbon source for producing value-added chemicals, including transportation biofuels, polymer precursors, and various additives. Most engineered microbial hosts and a select group of wild-type species can metabolize mixed sugars including oligosaccharides, hexoses, and pentoses that are hydrolyzed from plant biomass. However, most of these microorganisms consume glucose preferentially to non-glucose sugars through mechanisms generally defined as carbon catabolite repression. The current lack of simultaneous mixed-sugar utilization limits achievable titers, yields, and productivities. Therefore, the development of microbial platforms capable of fermenting mixed sugars simultaneously from biomass hydrolysates is essential for economical industry-scale production, particularly for compounds with marginal profits. This review aims to summarize recent discoveries and breakthroughs in the engineering of yeast cell factories for improved mixed-sugar co-utilization based on various metabolic engineering approaches. Emphasis is placed on enhanced non-glucose utilization, discovery of novel sugar transporters free from glucose repression, native xylose-utilizing microbes, consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), improved cellulase secretion, and creation of microbial consortia for improving mixed-sugar utilization. Perspectives on the future development of biorenewables industry are provided in the end.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
  2. Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States); Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1491605
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1492340
Report Number(s):
IS-J-9840
Journal ID: ISSN 1664-302X
Grant/Contract Number:  
DE-AC02-07CH11358
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 1664-302X
Publisher:
Frontiers Research Foundation
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Gao, Meirong, Ploessl, Deon, and Shao, Zengyi. Enhancing the Co-utilization of Biomass-Derived Mixed Sugars by Yeasts. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2018.03264.
Gao, Meirong, Ploessl, Deon, & Shao, Zengyi. Enhancing the Co-utilization of Biomass-Derived Mixed Sugars by Yeasts. United States. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2018.03264.
Gao, Meirong, Ploessl, Deon, and Shao, Zengyi. Tue . "Enhancing the Co-utilization of Biomass-Derived Mixed Sugars by Yeasts". United States. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2018.03264.
@article{osti_1491605,
title = {Enhancing the Co-utilization of Biomass-Derived Mixed Sugars by Yeasts},
author = {Gao, Meirong and Ploessl, Deon and Shao, Zengyi},
abstractNote = {Plant biomass is a promising carbon source for producing value-added chemicals, including transportation biofuels, polymer precursors, and various additives. Most engineered microbial hosts and a select group of wild-type species can metabolize mixed sugars including oligosaccharides, hexoses, and pentoses that are hydrolyzed from plant biomass. However, most of these microorganisms consume glucose preferentially to non-glucose sugars through mechanisms generally defined as carbon catabolite repression. The current lack of simultaneous mixed-sugar utilization limits achievable titers, yields, and productivities. Therefore, the development of microbial platforms capable of fermenting mixed sugars simultaneously from biomass hydrolysates is essential for economical industry-scale production, particularly for compounds with marginal profits. This review aims to summarize recent discoveries and breakthroughs in the engineering of yeast cell factories for improved mixed-sugar co-utilization based on various metabolic engineering approaches. Emphasis is placed on enhanced non-glucose utilization, discovery of novel sugar transporters free from glucose repression, native xylose-utilizing microbes, consolidated bioprocessing (CBP), improved cellulase secretion, and creation of microbial consortia for improving mixed-sugar utilization. Perspectives on the future development of biorenewables industry are provided in the end.},
doi = {10.3389/fmicb.2018.03264},
journal = {Frontiers in Microbiology},
number = ,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {1}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.3389/fmicb.2018.03264

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