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Title: Zeolitic imidazolate framework-coated acoustic sensors for room temperature detection of carbon dioxide and methane

Abstract

The integration of nanoporous materials such as metal organic frameworks (MOFs) with sensitive transducers can result in robust sensing platforms for monitoring gases and chemical vapors for a range of applications. Here, we report on an integration of the zeolitic imidazolate framework – 8 (ZIF-8) MOF with surface acoustic wave (SAW) and thickness shear mode quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) devices to monitor carbon dioxide (CO 2) and methane (CH 4) under ambient conditions. The MOF was directly coated on the Y-Z LiNbO 3 SAW delay lines (operating frequency, f 0 = 436 MHz) and AT-cut quartz TSM resonators (resonant frequency, f 0 = 9 MHz) and the devices were tested for various gases in N 2 under ambient conditions. The devices were able to detect the changes in CO 2 or CH 4 concentrations with relatively higher sensitivity to CO 2, which was due to its higher adsorption potential and heavier molecular weight. The sensors showed full reversibility and repeatability which were attributed to the physisorption of the gases into the MOF and high stability of the devices. Both types of sensors showed linear responses relative to changes in the binary gas compositions thereby allowing to construct calibration curves whichmore » correlated well with the expected mass changes in the sorbent layer based on mixed-gas gravimetric adsorption isotherms measured on bulk samples. For 200 nm thick films, the SAW sensitivities to CO 2 and CH 4 were 1.44 × 10 -6/vol% and 8 × 10 -8/vol%, respectively, against the QCM sensitivities 0.24 × 10-6/vol% and 1 × 10 -8/vol%, respectively, which were evaluated as the fractional change in the signal. The SAW sensors were also evaluated for 100 nm–300 nm thick films, the sensitivities of which were found to increase with the thickness due to the increased number of pores for the adsorption of a larger amount of gases. Finally, in addition, the MOF-coated SAW delay lines had a good response in wireless mode, demonstrating their potential to operate remotely for the detection of the gases at emission sites across the energy infrastructure.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [4]
  1. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); AECOM Pittsburgh, PA (United States)
  2. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  3. Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; DWGreve Consulting, Sedona, AZ (United States)
  4. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, Morgantown, WV, and Albany, OR (United States). In-house Research
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1491090
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1434150
Report Number(s):
CONTR-PUB-514
Journal ID: ISSN 2040-3364; NANOHL
Grant/Contract Number:  
FE0004000
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nanoscale
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 17; Journal ID: ISSN 2040-3364
Publisher:
Royal Society of Chemistry
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Devkota, Jagannath, Kim, Ki-Joong, Ohodnicki, Paul R., Culp, Jeffrey T., Greve, David W., and Lekse, Jonathan W.. Zeolitic imidazolate framework-coated acoustic sensors for room temperature detection of carbon dioxide and methane. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1039/C7NR09536H.
Devkota, Jagannath, Kim, Ki-Joong, Ohodnicki, Paul R., Culp, Jeffrey T., Greve, David W., & Lekse, Jonathan W.. Zeolitic imidazolate framework-coated acoustic sensors for room temperature detection of carbon dioxide and methane. United States. doi:10.1039/C7NR09536H.
Devkota, Jagannath, Kim, Ki-Joong, Ohodnicki, Paul R., Culp, Jeffrey T., Greve, David W., and Lekse, Jonathan W.. Mon . "Zeolitic imidazolate framework-coated acoustic sensors for room temperature detection of carbon dioxide and methane". United States. doi:10.1039/C7NR09536H. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1491090.
@article{osti_1491090,
title = {Zeolitic imidazolate framework-coated acoustic sensors for room temperature detection of carbon dioxide and methane},
author = {Devkota, Jagannath and Kim, Ki-Joong and Ohodnicki, Paul R. and Culp, Jeffrey T. and Greve, David W. and Lekse, Jonathan W.},
abstractNote = {The integration of nanoporous materials such as metal organic frameworks (MOFs) with sensitive transducers can result in robust sensing platforms for monitoring gases and chemical vapors for a range of applications. Here, we report on an integration of the zeolitic imidazolate framework – 8 (ZIF-8) MOF with surface acoustic wave (SAW) and thickness shear mode quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) devices to monitor carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) under ambient conditions. The MOF was directly coated on the Y-Z LiNbO3 SAW delay lines (operating frequency, f0 = 436 MHz) and AT-cut quartz TSM resonators (resonant frequency, f0 = 9 MHz) and the devices were tested for various gases in N2 under ambient conditions. The devices were able to detect the changes in CO2 or CH4 concentrations with relatively higher sensitivity to CO2, which was due to its higher adsorption potential and heavier molecular weight. The sensors showed full reversibility and repeatability which were attributed to the physisorption of the gases into the MOF and high stability of the devices. Both types of sensors showed linear responses relative to changes in the binary gas compositions thereby allowing to construct calibration curves which correlated well with the expected mass changes in the sorbent layer based on mixed-gas gravimetric adsorption isotherms measured on bulk samples. For 200 nm thick films, the SAW sensitivities to CO2 and CH4 were 1.44 × 10-6/vol% and 8 × 10-8/vol%, respectively, against the QCM sensitivities 0.24 × 10-6/vol% and 1 × 10-8/vol%, respectively, which were evaluated as the fractional change in the signal. The SAW sensors were also evaluated for 100 nm–300 nm thick films, the sensitivities of which were found to increase with the thickness due to the increased number of pores for the adsorption of a larger amount of gases. Finally, in addition, the MOF-coated SAW delay lines had a good response in wireless mode, demonstrating their potential to operate remotely for the detection of the gases at emission sites across the energy infrastructure.},
doi = {10.1039/C7NR09536H},
journal = {Nanoscale},
number = 17,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {1}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

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