skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Design and implementation of a Thomson parabola for fluence dependent energy-loss measurements at the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment

Abstract

The interaction of ion beams with matter includes the investigation of the basic principles of ion stopping in heated materials. An unsolved question is the effect of different, especially higher, ion beam fluences on ion stopping in solid targets. This is relevant in applications such as in fusion sciences. To address this question, a Thomson parabola was built for the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX-II) for ion energy-loss measurements at different ion beam fluences. The linear induction accelerator NDCX-II delivers 2 ns short, intense ion pulses, up to several tens of nC/pulse, or 1010-1011 ions, with a peak kinetic energy of ~1.1 MeV and a minimal spot size of 2 mm FWHM. For this particular accelerator the energy determination with conventional beam diagnostics, for example, time of flight measurements, is imprecise due to the non-trivial longitudinal phase space of the beam. In contrast, a Thomson parabola is well suited to reliably determine the beam energy distribution. The Thomson parabola differentiates charged particles by energy and charge-to-mass ratio, through deflection of charged particles by electric and magnetic fields. During first proof-of-principle experiments, we achieved to reproduce the average initial helium beam energy as predicted by computer simulations with a deviation ofmore » only 1.4 %. Successful energy-loss measurements with 1 μm thick Silicon Nitride foils show the suitability of the accelerator for such experiments. The initial ion energy was determined during a primary measurement without a target, while a second measurement, incorporating the target, was used to determine the transmitted energy. The energy-loss was then determined as the difference between the two energies.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [3];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4]; ORCiD logo [4];  [4];  [5];  [2]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Technical University Darmstadt (Germany)
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  3. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  4. Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)
  5. Technical University Darmstadt (Germany)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Fusion Energy Sciences (FES)
OSTI Identifier:
1490055
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1477817; OSTI ID: 1489662; OSTI ID: 1770030
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-813488
Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-76SF00515; AC52-07NA27344; AC0205CH11231; AC02-09CH11466; AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Review of Scientific Instruments
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 89; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS

Citation Formats

Treffert, F., Ji, Q., Seidl, P. A., Persaud, A., Ludewigt, B., Barnard, J. J., Friedman, A., Grote, D. P., Gilson, E. P., Kaganovich, I. D., Stepanov, A., Roth, M., and Schenkel, T.. Design and implementation of a Thomson parabola for fluence dependent energy-loss measurements at the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5030541.
Treffert, F., Ji, Q., Seidl, P. A., Persaud, A., Ludewigt, B., Barnard, J. J., Friedman, A., Grote, D. P., Gilson, E. P., Kaganovich, I. D., Stepanov, A., Roth, M., & Schenkel, T.. Design and implementation of a Thomson parabola for fluence dependent energy-loss measurements at the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment. United States. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5030541
Treffert, F., Ji, Q., Seidl, P. A., Persaud, A., Ludewigt, B., Barnard, J. J., Friedman, A., Grote, D. P., Gilson, E. P., Kaganovich, I. D., Stepanov, A., Roth, M., and Schenkel, T.. Tue . "Design and implementation of a Thomson parabola for fluence dependent energy-loss measurements at the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment". United States. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5030541. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1490055.
@article{osti_1490055,
title = {Design and implementation of a Thomson parabola for fluence dependent energy-loss measurements at the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment},
author = {Treffert, F. and Ji, Q. and Seidl, P. A. and Persaud, A. and Ludewigt, B. and Barnard, J. J. and Friedman, A. and Grote, D. P. and Gilson, E. P. and Kaganovich, I. D. and Stepanov, A. and Roth, M. and Schenkel, T.},
abstractNote = {The interaction of ion beams with matter includes the investigation of the basic principles of ion stopping in heated materials. An unsolved question is the effect of different, especially higher, ion beam fluences on ion stopping in solid targets. This is relevant in applications such as in fusion sciences. To address this question, a Thomson parabola was built for the Neutralized Drift Compression eXperiment (NDCX-II) for ion energy-loss measurements at different ion beam fluences. The linear induction accelerator NDCX-II delivers 2 ns short, intense ion pulses, up to several tens of nC/pulse, or 1010-1011 ions, with a peak kinetic energy of ~1.1 MeV and a minimal spot size of 2 mm FWHM. For this particular accelerator the energy determination with conventional beam diagnostics, for example, time of flight measurements, is imprecise due to the non-trivial longitudinal phase space of the beam. In contrast, a Thomson parabola is well suited to reliably determine the beam energy distribution. The Thomson parabola differentiates charged particles by energy and charge-to-mass ratio, through deflection of charged particles by electric and magnetic fields. During first proof-of-principle experiments, we achieved to reproduce the average initial helium beam energy as predicted by computer simulations with a deviation of only 1.4 %. Successful energy-loss measurements with 1 μm thick Silicon Nitride foils show the suitability of the accelerator for such experiments. The initial ion energy was determined during a primary measurement without a target, while a second measurement, incorporating the target, was used to determine the transmitted energy. The energy-loss was then determined as the difference between the two energies.},
doi = {10.1063/1.5030541},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 10,
volume = 89,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {10}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1 work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Figures / Tables:

FIG. 1 FIG. 1: The Thomson parabola is located 47.2 cm (dT-P) after the target. It consists of a shielding plate with a 0.4 mm (d2) diameter pinhole, located 5 cm in front of the magnet assembly. The assembly consists of a $L$B = 9.5 cm long magnet and $L$E = 15.3more » cm long electric plates. The drift between the end of the electric plates and scintillator measures 15 cm (DE). Another pinhole (d1 = 2 mm) is located directly in front of the target.« less

Save / Share:

Works referenced in this record:

The NDCX-II engineering design
journal, January 2014

  • Waldron, W. L.; Abraham, W. J.; Arbelaez, D.
  • Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, Vol. 733
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.nima.2013.05.063

New Detection Device for Thomson Parabola Spectrometer for Diagnosis of the Laser-Plasma Ion Beam
journal, January 2006

  • Mori, Michiaki; Kando, Masaki; Pirozhkov, Alexander S.
  • Plasma and Fusion Research, Vol. 1
  • DOI: 10.1585/pfr.1.042

Femtosecond dynamics – snapshots of the early ion-track evolution
journal, August 2004

  • Schiwietz, G.; Czerski, K.; Roth, M.
  • Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms, Vol. 225, Issue 1-2
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.nimb.2004.05.041

Development and testing of a pulsed helium ion source for probing materials and warm dense matter studies
journal, February 2016

  • Ji, Q.; Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W. L.
  • Review of Scientific Instruments, Vol. 87, Issue 2
  • DOI: 10.1063/1.4932569

Computational Methods in the Warp Code Framework for Kinetic Simulations of Particle Beams and Plasmas
journal, May 2014

  • Friedman, Alex; Cohen, Ronald H.; Grote, David P.
  • IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, Vol. 42, Issue 5
  • DOI: 10.1109/TPS.2014.2308546

Development and calibration of a Thomson parabola with microchannel plate for the detection of laser-accelerated MeV ions
journal, January 2008

  • Harres, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Brambrink, E.
  • Review of Scientific Instruments, Vol. 79, Issue 9
  • DOI: 10.1063/1.2987687

Short intense ion pulses for materials and warm dense matter research
journal, November 2015

  • Seidl, Peter A.; Persaud, Arun; Waldron, William L.
  • Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section A: Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment, Vol. 800
  • DOI: 10.1016/j.nima.2015.08.013

Irradiation of materials with short, intense ion pulses at NDCX-II
journal, May 2017


Instrumentation for diagnostics and control of laser-accelerated proton (ion) beams
journal, May 2014


    Works referencing / citing this record:

    Absolute Calibration of GafChromic Film for Very High Flux Laser Driven Ion Beams
    text, January 2019


    Absolute calibration of GafChromic film for very high flux laser driven ion beams
    journal, May 2019

    • Bin, J. H.; Ji, Q.; Seidl, P. A.
    • Review of Scientific Instruments, Vol. 90, Issue 5
    • DOI: 10.1063/1.5086822

      Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.