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Title: Self-assembling of formic acid on the partially oxidized p(2×1) Cu(110) surface reconstruction at low coverages

Carbon dioxide (CO 2) reduction for synthetic fuel generation could be an integral part of a sustainable energy future. Copper (Cu) is the leading electrocatalyst for CO 2 reduction to produce multiple C-containing products such as C1 and C2 hydrocarbons and oxygenates. Understanding the mechanisms leading to their production could help optimize these pathways further. Adsorption studies of the many possible intermediates on well-characterized surfaces are crucial to elucidating these mechanisms. In this work, we explore the adsorption configurations of formic acid (HCOOH) on the surface of the partially oxidized p(2 × 1) reconstruction of the Cu(110) surface, using low-temperature scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy, in conjunction with density functional theory modeling. We find that HCOOH adsorbs favorably on the CuO chain comprising the reconstruction. The adsorption interactions involve dative bonding of the carbonyl O to the oxidized Cu and hydrogen bonding of the OH group to the surface O or to an adjacently adsorbed HCOOH molecule. Furthermore, cooperative adsorption of the molecules occurs, forming two- to three-molecule-long oligomer chains, facilitated by intermolecular hydrogen bonding and mutual polarization of the CuO acid-base adsorption sites.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [2] ; ORCiD logo [3] ; ORCiD logo [2] ; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States); Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)
  2. Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States)
  3. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
BNL-210825-2018-JAAM
Journal ID: ISSN 0021-9606
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012704
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Chemical Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 150; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-9606
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Research Org:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY
OSTI Identifier:
1489348

Chen, Zhu, Martirez, John Mark P., Zahl, Percy, Carter, Emily A., and Koel, Bruce E.. Self-assembling of formic acid on the partially oxidized p(2×1) Cu(110) surface reconstruction at low coverages. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1063/1.5046697.
Chen, Zhu, Martirez, John Mark P., Zahl, Percy, Carter, Emily A., & Koel, Bruce E.. Self-assembling of formic acid on the partially oxidized p(2×1) Cu(110) surface reconstruction at low coverages. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5046697.
Chen, Zhu, Martirez, John Mark P., Zahl, Percy, Carter, Emily A., and Koel, Bruce E.. 2018. "Self-assembling of formic acid on the partially oxidized p(2×1) Cu(110) surface reconstruction at low coverages". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5046697.
@article{osti_1489348,
title = {Self-assembling of formic acid on the partially oxidized p(2×1) Cu(110) surface reconstruction at low coverages},
author = {Chen, Zhu and Martirez, John Mark P. and Zahl, Percy and Carter, Emily A. and Koel, Bruce E.},
abstractNote = {Carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction for synthetic fuel generation could be an integral part of a sustainable energy future. Copper (Cu) is the leading electrocatalyst for CO2 reduction to produce multiple C-containing products such as C1 and C2 hydrocarbons and oxygenates. Understanding the mechanisms leading to their production could help optimize these pathways further. Adsorption studies of the many possible intermediates on well-characterized surfaces are crucial to elucidating these mechanisms. In this work, we explore the adsorption configurations of formic acid (HCOOH) on the surface of the partially oxidized p(2 × 1) reconstruction of the Cu(110) surface, using low-temperature scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopy, in conjunction with density functional theory modeling. We find that HCOOH adsorbs favorably on the CuO chain comprising the reconstruction. The adsorption interactions involve dative bonding of the carbonyl O to the oxidized Cu and hydrogen bonding of the OH group to the surface O or to an adjacently adsorbed HCOOH molecule. Furthermore, cooperative adsorption of the molecules occurs, forming two- to three-molecule-long oligomer chains, facilitated by intermolecular hydrogen bonding and mutual polarization of the CuO acid-base adsorption sites.},
doi = {10.1063/1.5046697},
journal = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 150,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {12}
}

Works referenced in this record:

CO2 Reduction at Low Overpotential on Cu Electrodes Resulting from the Reduction of Thick Cu2O Films
journal, April 2012
  • Li, Christina W.; Kanan, Matthew W.
  • Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 134, Issue 17, p. 7231-7234
  • DOI: 10.1021/ja3010978