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Title: Driving biomass breakdown through engineered cellulosomes

Abstract

Extraction of sugar is the rate-limiting step in converting unpretreated biomass into value-added products through microbial fermentation. Both anaerobic fungi and anaerobic bacteria have evolved to produce large multi-cellulase complexes referred to as cellulosomes, which are powerful machines for biomass deconstruction. Characterization of bacterial cellulosomes has inspired synthetic "designer" cellulosomes, consisting of parts discovered from the native system that have proven useful for cellulose depolymerization. By contrast, the multi-cellulase complexes produced by anaerobic fungi are much more poorly understood, and to date their composition, architecture, and enzyme tethering mechanism remain unknown and heavily debated. Here, we compare current knowledge pertaining to the cellulosomes produced by both bacteria and fungi, including their application to synthetic enzyme-tethered systems for tunneled biocatalysis. We highlight gaps in knowledge and opportunities for discovery, especially pertaining to the potential of fungal cellulosome-inspired systems.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); United States Dept. of Agriculture (USDA); US Army Research Office (ARO)
OSTI Identifier:
1485181
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0010352; 2011–67017–20459; W911NF-09–0001
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Bioengineered
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 2165-5979
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; anaerobic fungi; biofuels; cellulase; cellulosome; lignocellulose

Citation Formats

Gilmore, Sean P., Henske, John K., and O'Malley, Michelle A. Driving biomass breakdown through engineered cellulosomes. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1080/21655979.2015.1060379.
Gilmore, Sean P., Henske, John K., & O'Malley, Michelle A. Driving biomass breakdown through engineered cellulosomes. United States. doi:10.1080/21655979.2015.1060379.
Gilmore, Sean P., Henske, John K., and O'Malley, Michelle A. Thu . "Driving biomass breakdown through engineered cellulosomes". United States. doi:10.1080/21655979.2015.1060379. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1485181.
@article{osti_1485181,
title = {Driving biomass breakdown through engineered cellulosomes},
author = {Gilmore, Sean P. and Henske, John K. and O'Malley, Michelle A.},
abstractNote = {Extraction of sugar is the rate-limiting step in converting unpretreated biomass into value-added products through microbial fermentation. Both anaerobic fungi and anaerobic bacteria have evolved to produce large multi-cellulase complexes referred to as cellulosomes, which are powerful machines for biomass deconstruction. Characterization of bacterial cellulosomes has inspired synthetic "designer" cellulosomes, consisting of parts discovered from the native system that have proven useful for cellulose depolymerization. By contrast, the multi-cellulase complexes produced by anaerobic fungi are much more poorly understood, and to date their composition, architecture, and enzyme tethering mechanism remain unknown and heavily debated. Here, we compare current knowledge pertaining to the cellulosomes produced by both bacteria and fungi, including their application to synthetic enzyme-tethered systems for tunneled biocatalysis. We highlight gaps in knowledge and opportunities for discovery, especially pertaining to the potential of fungal cellulosome-inspired systems.},
doi = {10.1080/21655979.2015.1060379},
journal = {Bioengineered},
number = 4,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {6}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

Pretreatment technologies for an efficient bioethanol production process based on enzymatic hydrolysis: A review
journal, July 2010