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Title: Bacterial microcompartments

Abstract

We report that bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are self-assembling organelles that consist of an enzymatic core that is encapsulated by a selectively permeable protein shell. The potential to form BMCs is widespread and found across the kingdom Bacteria. BMCs have crucial roles in carbon dioxide fixation in autotrophs and the catabolism of organic substrates in heterotrophs. They contribute to the metabolic versatility of bacteria, providing a competitive advantage in specific environmental niches. Although BMCs were first visualized more than 60 years ago, it is mainly in the past decade that progress has been made in understanding their metabolic diversity and the structural basis of their assembly and function. This progress has not only heightened our understanding of their role in microbial metabolism but is also beginning to enable their use in a variety of applications in synthetic biology. In this work, we focus on recent insights into the structure, assembly, diversity and function of BMCs.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1]
  1. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)
  3. Max Planck Institute for Terrestrial Microbiology, Marburg (Germany)
  4. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1485085
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231; FG02-91ER20021
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Reviews Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 1740-1526
Publisher:
Springer Nature
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Kerfeld, Cheryl A., Aussignargues, Clement, Zarzycki, Jan, Cai, Fei, and Sutter, Markus. Bacterial microcompartments. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1038/nrmicro.2018.10.
Kerfeld, Cheryl A., Aussignargues, Clement, Zarzycki, Jan, Cai, Fei, & Sutter, Markus. Bacterial microcompartments. United States. doi:10.1038/nrmicro.2018.10.
Kerfeld, Cheryl A., Aussignargues, Clement, Zarzycki, Jan, Cai, Fei, and Sutter, Markus. Mon . "Bacterial microcompartments". United States. doi:10.1038/nrmicro.2018.10. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1485085.
@article{osti_1485085,
title = {Bacterial microcompartments},
author = {Kerfeld, Cheryl A. and Aussignargues, Clement and Zarzycki, Jan and Cai, Fei and Sutter, Markus},
abstractNote = {We report that bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are self-assembling organelles that consist of an enzymatic core that is encapsulated by a selectively permeable protein shell. The potential to form BMCs is widespread and found across the kingdom Bacteria. BMCs have crucial roles in carbon dioxide fixation in autotrophs and the catabolism of organic substrates in heterotrophs. They contribute to the metabolic versatility of bacteria, providing a competitive advantage in specific environmental niches. Although BMCs were first visualized more than 60 years ago, it is mainly in the past decade that progress has been made in understanding their metabolic diversity and the structural basis of their assembly and function. This progress has not only heightened our understanding of their role in microbial metabolism but is also beginning to enable their use in a variety of applications in synthetic biology. In this work, we focus on recent insights into the structure, assembly, diversity and function of BMCs.},
doi = {10.1038/nrmicro.2018.10},
journal = {Nature Reviews Microbiology},
number = 5,
volume = 16,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {3}
}

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Cited by: 35 works
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Works referenced in this record:

Synthetic protein scaffolds provide modular control over metabolic flux
journal, August 2009

  • Dueber, John E.; Wu, Gabriel C.; Malmirchegini, G. Reza
  • Nature Biotechnology, Vol. 27, Issue 8, p. 753-759
  • DOI: 10.1038/nbt.1557