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Title: Polarization induced contrast X-ray fluorescence at submicrometer resolution reveals nanometer apatite crystal orientations across entire tooth sections

Abstract

For biomedical research, successful imaging of calcified microstructures often relies on absorption differences between features, or on employing dies with selective affinity to areas of interest. When texture is concerned, e.g. for crystal orientation studies, polarization induced contrast is of particular interest. This requires sufficient interaction of the incoming radiation with the volume of interest in the sample to produce orientation-based contrast. Here we demonstrate polarization induced contrast at the calcium K-edge using submicron sized monochromatic synchrotron X-ray beams. We exploit the orientation dependent subtle absorption differences of hydroxyl-apatite crystals in teeth, with respect to the polarization field of the beam. Interaction occurs with the fully mineralized samples, such that differences in density do not contribute to the contrast. Our results show how polarization induced contrast X-ray fluorescence mapping at specific energies of the calcium K-edge reveals the micrometer and submicrometer crystal arrangements in human tooth tissues. This facilitates combining both high spatial resolution and large fields of view, achieved in relatively short acquisition times in reflection geometry. In enamel we observe the varying crystal orientations of the micron sized prisms exposed on our prepared surface. We easily reproduce crystal orientation maps, typically observed in polished thin sections. We evenmore » reveal maps of submicrometer mineralization fronts in spherulites in intertubular dentine. This Ca K-edge polarization sensitive method (XRF-PIC) does not require thin samples for transmission nor extensive sample preparation. It can be used on both fresh, moist samples as well as fossilized samples where the information of interests lies in the crystal orientations and where the crystalline domains extend several micrometers beneath the exposed surface.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Xploraytion GmbH, Berlin (Germany)
  2. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Technische Universität Dresden (Germany)
  3. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Sorbonne Universités, Laboratoire d’Archéologie Moléculaire et Structurale (LAMS), Paris (France)
  4. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  5. Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1484326
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1497983
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-756138
Journal ID: ISSN 2156-7085; 943344
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Biomedical Optics Express
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2156-7085
Publisher:
Optical Society of America
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Hesse, Bernhard, Stier, Deborah, Cotte, Marine, Forien, Jean-Baptiste, and Zaslansky, Paul. Polarization induced contrast X-ray fluorescence at submicrometer resolution reveals nanometer apatite crystal orientations across entire tooth sections. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1364/BOE.10.000018.
Hesse, Bernhard, Stier, Deborah, Cotte, Marine, Forien, Jean-Baptiste, & Zaslansky, Paul. Polarization induced contrast X-ray fluorescence at submicrometer resolution reveals nanometer apatite crystal orientations across entire tooth sections. United States. doi:10.1364/BOE.10.000018.
Hesse, Bernhard, Stier, Deborah, Cotte, Marine, Forien, Jean-Baptiste, and Zaslansky, Paul. Mon . "Polarization induced contrast X-ray fluorescence at submicrometer resolution reveals nanometer apatite crystal orientations across entire tooth sections". United States. doi:10.1364/BOE.10.000018.
@article{osti_1484326,
title = {Polarization induced contrast X-ray fluorescence at submicrometer resolution reveals nanometer apatite crystal orientations across entire tooth sections},
author = {Hesse, Bernhard and Stier, Deborah and Cotte, Marine and Forien, Jean-Baptiste and Zaslansky, Paul},
abstractNote = {For biomedical research, successful imaging of calcified microstructures often relies on absorption differences between features, or on employing dies with selective affinity to areas of interest. When texture is concerned, e.g. for crystal orientation studies, polarization induced contrast is of particular interest. This requires sufficient interaction of the incoming radiation with the volume of interest in the sample to produce orientation-based contrast. Here we demonstrate polarization induced contrast at the calcium K-edge using submicron sized monochromatic synchrotron X-ray beams. We exploit the orientation dependent subtle absorption differences of hydroxyl-apatite crystals in teeth, with respect to the polarization field of the beam. Interaction occurs with the fully mineralized samples, such that differences in density do not contribute to the contrast. Our results show how polarization induced contrast X-ray fluorescence mapping at specific energies of the calcium K-edge reveals the micrometer and submicrometer crystal arrangements in human tooth tissues. This facilitates combining both high spatial resolution and large fields of view, achieved in relatively short acquisition times in reflection geometry. In enamel we observe the varying crystal orientations of the micron sized prisms exposed on our prepared surface. We easily reproduce crystal orientation maps, typically observed in polished thin sections. We even reveal maps of submicrometer mineralization fronts in spherulites in intertubular dentine. This Ca K-edge polarization sensitive method (XRF-PIC) does not require thin samples for transmission nor extensive sample preparation. It can be used on both fresh, moist samples as well as fossilized samples where the information of interests lies in the crystal orientations and where the crystalline domains extend several micrometers beneath the exposed surface.},
doi = {10.1364/BOE.10.000018},
journal = {Biomedical Optics Express},
number = 1,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {12}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1364/BOE.10.000018

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1 work
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Figures / Tables:

Figure 1 Figure 1: Schematic illustration of the main optical components of the setup installed at beamline ID21 for XRF-PIC mapping. Two undulators are used to generate the X-rays that are polarized in the horizontal plane, subsequently monochromatized by a fixed exit double-crystal Si(111) Kohzu-monochromator, then focused using KB optics. The polarizationmore » orientation is not affected by any of the components downstream of the source until impinging on the sample. Following interaction with the apatite (in the tooth), non-polarized XRF radiation is generated. The total XRF signal is collected by a photodiode detector.« less

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