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Title: Methane emissions from tree stems: a new frontier in the global carbon cycle

Abstract

Tree stems from wetland, floodplain and upland forests can produce and emit methane (CH 4). Tree CH 4 stem emissions have high spatial and temporal variability, but there is no consensus on the biophysical mechanisms that drive stem CH 4 production and emissions. Here, we summarize up to 30 opportunities and challenges for stem CH 4 emissions research, which when addressed will improve estimates of magnitudes, patterns, drivers and trace the potential origin of CH 4 emissions. We identified the need (i) for both long–term high frequency measurements of stem CH 4 emissions to understand the fine scale processes, alongside rapid large–scale measurements designed to understand variability across individuals, species and ecosystems; (ii) to identify microorganisms and biogeochemical pathways associated with CH 4 production; and (iii) to develop a mechanistic model including passive and active transport of CH 4 from the soil–tree–atmosphere continuum. Addressing these challenges would help to constrain magnitudes and patterns of CH 4 emissions, and would allow for the integration of pathways and mechanisms of CH 4 production and emissions into process–based models. As a result, these advances will facilitate upscaling of stem CH 4 emissions to the ecosystem level and quantify the role of stem CHmore » 4 emissions for the local–to–global CH 4 budget.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [3];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10];  [11]; ORCiD logo [12];  [13];  [1];  [14];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States)
  2. Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)
  3. Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD (United States)
  4. Aalborg Univ. (Denmark)
  5. Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Skidmore College, Saratoga Springs, NY (United States)
  6. Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)
  7. Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark)
  8. Lancaster Univ., Lancaster (United Kingdom)
  9. Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)
  10. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, MD (United States)
  11. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  12. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
  13. Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture (Japan)
  14. Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1484115
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1487299; OSTI ID: 1506688
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-137837
Journal ID: ISSN 0028-646X
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725; AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
New Phytologist
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: in press; Journal Issue: none; Journal ID: ISSN 0028-646X
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; methane emissions; CH 4 transport; tree stems; upland forests; wetland forests; methanogenesis; spatial variability; temporal variability; methane emissions, CH4, tree stems, upland forests, wetland forests, methanogenesis, spatial variability, temporal variability

Citation Formats

Barba, Josep, Bradford, Mark A., Brewer, Paul E., Bruhn, Dan, Covey, Kristofer, van Haren, Joost, Megonigal, J. Patrick, Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard, Pangala, Sunitha R., Pihlatie, Mari, Poulter, Ben, Rivas-Ubach, Albert, Schadt, Christopher Warren, Terazawa, Kazuhiko, Warner, Daniel L., Zhang, Zhen, and Vargas, Rodrigo. Methane emissions from tree stems: a new frontier in the global carbon cycle. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1111/nph.15582.
Barba, Josep, Bradford, Mark A., Brewer, Paul E., Bruhn, Dan, Covey, Kristofer, van Haren, Joost, Megonigal, J. Patrick, Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard, Pangala, Sunitha R., Pihlatie, Mari, Poulter, Ben, Rivas-Ubach, Albert, Schadt, Christopher Warren, Terazawa, Kazuhiko, Warner, Daniel L., Zhang, Zhen, & Vargas, Rodrigo. Methane emissions from tree stems: a new frontier in the global carbon cycle. United States. doi:10.1111/nph.15582.
Barba, Josep, Bradford, Mark A., Brewer, Paul E., Bruhn, Dan, Covey, Kristofer, van Haren, Joost, Megonigal, J. Patrick, Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard, Pangala, Sunitha R., Pihlatie, Mari, Poulter, Ben, Rivas-Ubach, Albert, Schadt, Christopher Warren, Terazawa, Kazuhiko, Warner, Daniel L., Zhang, Zhen, and Vargas, Rodrigo. Mon . "Methane emissions from tree stems: a new frontier in the global carbon cycle". United States. doi:10.1111/nph.15582. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1484115.
@article{osti_1484115,
title = {Methane emissions from tree stems: a new frontier in the global carbon cycle},
author = {Barba, Josep and Bradford, Mark A. and Brewer, Paul E. and Bruhn, Dan and Covey, Kristofer and van Haren, Joost and Megonigal, J. Patrick and Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard and Pangala, Sunitha R. and Pihlatie, Mari and Poulter, Ben and Rivas-Ubach, Albert and Schadt, Christopher Warren and Terazawa, Kazuhiko and Warner, Daniel L. and Zhang, Zhen and Vargas, Rodrigo},
abstractNote = {Tree stems from wetland, floodplain and upland forests can produce and emit methane (CH4). Tree CH4 stem emissions have high spatial and temporal variability, but there is no consensus on the biophysical mechanisms that drive stem CH4 production and emissions. Here, we summarize up to 30 opportunities and challenges for stem CH4 emissions research, which when addressed will improve estimates of magnitudes, patterns, drivers and trace the potential origin of CH4 emissions. We identified the need (i) for both long–term high frequency measurements of stem CH4 emissions to understand the fine scale processes, alongside rapid large–scale measurements designed to understand variability across individuals, species and ecosystems; (ii) to identify microorganisms and biogeochemical pathways associated with CH4 production; and (iii) to develop a mechanistic model including passive and active transport of CH4 from the soil–tree–atmosphere continuum. Addressing these challenges would help to constrain magnitudes and patterns of CH4 emissions, and would allow for the integration of pathways and mechanisms of CH4 production and emissions into process–based models. As a result, these advances will facilitate upscaling of stem CH4 emissions to the ecosystem level and quantify the role of stem CH4 emissions for the local–to–global CH4 budget.},
doi = {10.1111/nph.15582},
journal = {New Phytologist},
number = none,
volume = in press,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {11}
}

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