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Title: Marine microalgae commercial production improves sustainability of global fisheries and aquaculture

A method is described for saving 30% of the world fish catch by producing fishmeal and fish oil replacement products from marine microalgae, the natural source of proteins and oils in the marine food web. To examine the commercial aspects of such a method, we adapt a model based on results of microalgae production in Hawaii and apply it to Thailand, the world’s fourth largest producer of fishmeal. A model facility of 111 ha would produce 2,750 tonnes yr -1 of protein and 2,330 tonnes yr -1 of algal oil, at a capital cost of $29.3 M. Such a facility would generate $5.5 M in average annual net income over its 30-year lifetime. Deployment of 100 such facilities in Thailand would replace all domestic production of fishmeal, 10% of world production, on ~1.5% of the land now used to cultivate oil palm. Such a global industry would generate ~$6.5 billion in annual net income.
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [4] ; ORCiD logo [5] ;  [2] ;  [6] ;  [7] ;  [8]
  1. B & D Engineering and Consulting LLC, Lander, WY (United States); Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States). Pacific Aquaculture and Coastal Resources Center
  2. Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States). Pacific Aquaculture and Coastal Resources Center
  3. Thai Union Feedmill Co., Ltd., Samutskorn Province (Thailand)
  4. Prince of Songkla Univ. (Thailand). Dept. of Aquatic Science
  5. Nord Univ., Bodo (Norway). Faculty of Biosciences and Aquaculture
  6. Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States). Pacific Aquaculture and Coastal Resources Center; Cinglas Ltd., Chester (United Kingdom)
  7. Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States). Pacific Aquaculture and Coastal Resources Center; Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
  8. Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States). Pacific Aquaculture and Coastal Resources Center; Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Animal Sciences
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
EE0003371; EE0007091
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Research Org:
Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1483567

Beal, Colin M., Gerber, Léda N., Thongrod, Supis, Phromkunthong, Wutiporn, Kiron, Viswanath, Granados, Joe, Archibald, Ian, Greene, Charles H., and Huntley, Mark E.. Marine microalgae commercial production improves sustainability of global fisheries and aquaculture. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-33504-w.
Beal, Colin M., Gerber, Léda N., Thongrod, Supis, Phromkunthong, Wutiporn, Kiron, Viswanath, Granados, Joe, Archibald, Ian, Greene, Charles H., & Huntley, Mark E.. Marine microalgae commercial production improves sustainability of global fisheries and aquaculture. United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-33504-w.
Beal, Colin M., Gerber, Léda N., Thongrod, Supis, Phromkunthong, Wutiporn, Kiron, Viswanath, Granados, Joe, Archibald, Ian, Greene, Charles H., and Huntley, Mark E.. 2018. "Marine microalgae commercial production improves sustainability of global fisheries and aquaculture". United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-33504-w. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1483567.
@article{osti_1483567,
title = {Marine microalgae commercial production improves sustainability of global fisheries and aquaculture},
author = {Beal, Colin M. and Gerber, Léda N. and Thongrod, Supis and Phromkunthong, Wutiporn and Kiron, Viswanath and Granados, Joe and Archibald, Ian and Greene, Charles H. and Huntley, Mark E.},
abstractNote = {A method is described for saving 30% of the world fish catch by producing fishmeal and fish oil replacement products from marine microalgae, the natural source of proteins and oils in the marine food web. To examine the commercial aspects of such a method, we adapt a model based on results of microalgae production in Hawaii and apply it to Thailand, the world’s fourth largest producer of fishmeal. A model facility of 111 ha would produce 2,750 tonnes yr-1 of protein and 2,330 tonnes yr-1 of algal oil, at a capital cost of $29.3 M. Such a facility would generate $5.5 M in average annual net income over its 30-year lifetime. Deployment of 100 such facilities in Thailand would replace all domestic production of fishmeal, 10% of world production, on ~1.5% of the land now used to cultivate oil palm. Such a global industry would generate ~$6.5 billion in annual net income.},
doi = {10.1038/s41598-018-33504-w},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = 1,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {10}
}

Works referenced in this record:

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