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Title: Making glassy solids ductile at room temperature by imparting flexibility into their amorphous structure

Abstract

Making glasses ductile at room temperature is a daunting challenge, but has been shown to be feasible in recent years. We explain the plastic flow from the standpoint of the flexibility available in the amorphous structure: imparting flexibility into the structure facilitates bond switching needed to mediate shear transformations to carry strain. This structure–property correlation is demonstrated using molecular dynamics simulation data. The flexibility can be improved via ultrafast quench or rejuvenation. In particular, the flexibility volume parameter offers a quantitative metric to explain the flexibility and deformability, even for glasses where the commonly cited free volume is not applicable.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Department of Materials Science and Engineering
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1483318
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1493264
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231; FG02-16ER46056
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Materials Research Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 2166-3831
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Glassy or amorphous materials; plastic flow and ductility; molecular dynamics; structure–property correlation; flexibility versus free volume

Citation Formats

Fan, Zhao, Ding, Jun, and Ma, Evan. Making glassy solids ductile at room temperature by imparting flexibility into their amorphous structure. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1080/21663831.2018.1503198.
Fan, Zhao, Ding, Jun, & Ma, Evan. Making glassy solids ductile at room temperature by imparting flexibility into their amorphous structure. United States. doi:10.1080/21663831.2018.1503198.
Fan, Zhao, Ding, Jun, and Ma, Evan. Wed . "Making glassy solids ductile at room temperature by imparting flexibility into their amorphous structure". United States. doi:10.1080/21663831.2018.1503198.
@article{osti_1483318,
title = {Making glassy solids ductile at room temperature by imparting flexibility into their amorphous structure},
author = {Fan, Zhao and Ding, Jun and Ma, Evan},
abstractNote = {Making glasses ductile at room temperature is a daunting challenge, but has been shown to be feasible in recent years. We explain the plastic flow from the standpoint of the flexibility available in the amorphous structure: imparting flexibility into the structure facilitates bond switching needed to mediate shear transformations to carry strain. This structure–property correlation is demonstrated using molecular dynamics simulation data. The flexibility can be improved via ultrafast quench or rejuvenation. In particular, the flexibility volume parameter offers a quantitative metric to explain the flexibility and deformability, even for glasses where the commonly cited free volume is not applicable.},
doi = {10.1080/21663831.2018.1503198},
journal = {Materials Research Letters},
number = 10,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {8}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1080/21663831.2018.1503198

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1 work
Citation information provided by
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