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Title: A genomic perspective on stoichiometric regulation of soil carbon cycling

Abstract

Similar to plant growth, soil carbon (C) cycling is constrained by the availability of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). We hypothesized that stoichiometric control over soil microbial C cycling may be shaped by functional guilds with distinct nutrient substrate preferences. Across a series of rice fields spanning 5-25% soil C (N:P from 1:12 to 1:70), C turnover was best correlated with P availability and increased with experimental N addition only in lower C (mineral) soils with N:P-1/216. Microbial community membership also varied with soil stoichiometry but not with N addition. Shotgun metagenome data revealed changes in community functions with increasing C turnover, including a shift from aromatic C to carbohydrate utilization accompanied by lower N uptake and P scavenging. Similar patterns of C, N and P acquisition, along with higher ribosomal RNA operon copy numbers, distinguished that microbial taxa positively correlated with C turnover. Considering such tradeoffs in genomic resource allocation patterns among taxa strengthened correlations between microbial community composition and C cycling, suggesting simplified guilds amenable to ecosystem modeling. Our results suggest that patterns of soil C turnover may reflect community-dependent metabolic shifts driven by resource allocation strategies, analogous to growth rate-stoichiometry coupling in animal and plant communities.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4]
  1. USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States)
  2. Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC (United States)
  3. Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)
  4. USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23). Biological Systems Science Division
OSTI Identifier:
1482526
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
The ISME Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 1751-7362
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Hartman, Wyatt H., Ye, Rongzhong, Horwath, William R., and Tringe, Susannah G. A genomic perspective on stoichiometric regulation of soil carbon cycling. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/ismej.2017.115.
Hartman, Wyatt H., Ye, Rongzhong, Horwath, William R., & Tringe, Susannah G. A genomic perspective on stoichiometric regulation of soil carbon cycling. United States. doi:10.1038/ismej.2017.115.
Hartman, Wyatt H., Ye, Rongzhong, Horwath, William R., and Tringe, Susannah G. Fri . "A genomic perspective on stoichiometric regulation of soil carbon cycling". United States. doi:10.1038/ismej.2017.115. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1482526.
@article{osti_1482526,
title = {A genomic perspective on stoichiometric regulation of soil carbon cycling},
author = {Hartman, Wyatt H. and Ye, Rongzhong and Horwath, William R. and Tringe, Susannah G.},
abstractNote = {Similar to plant growth, soil carbon (C) cycling is constrained by the availability of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). We hypothesized that stoichiometric control over soil microbial C cycling may be shaped by functional guilds with distinct nutrient substrate preferences. Across a series of rice fields spanning 5-25% soil C (N:P from 1:12 to 1:70), C turnover was best correlated with P availability and increased with experimental N addition only in lower C (mineral) soils with N:P-1/216. Microbial community membership also varied with soil stoichiometry but not with N addition. Shotgun metagenome data revealed changes in community functions with increasing C turnover, including a shift from aromatic C to carbohydrate utilization accompanied by lower N uptake and P scavenging. Similar patterns of C, N and P acquisition, along with higher ribosomal RNA operon copy numbers, distinguished that microbial taxa positively correlated with C turnover. Considering such tradeoffs in genomic resource allocation patterns among taxa strengthened correlations between microbial community composition and C cycling, suggesting simplified guilds amenable to ecosystem modeling. Our results suggest that patterns of soil C turnover may reflect community-dependent metabolic shifts driven by resource allocation strategies, analogous to growth rate-stoichiometry coupling in animal and plant communities.},
doi = {10.1038/ismej.2017.115},
journal = {The ISME Journal},
number = 12,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {7}
}

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Cited by: 11 works
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Works referenced in this record:

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