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Title: Metabolic Noise and Distinct Subpopulations Observed by Single Cell LAESI Mass Spectrometry of Plant Cells in situ

Abstract

Phenotypic variations and stochastic expression of transcripts, proteins, and metabolites in biological tissues lead to cellular heterogeneity. As a result, distinct cellular subpopulations emerge. They are characterized by different metabolite expression levels and by associated metabolic noise distributions. To capture these biological variations unperturbed, highly sensitive in situ analytical techniques are needed that can sample tissue embedded single cells with minimum sample preparation. Optical fiber-based laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (f-LAESI-MS) is a promising tool for metabolic profiling of single cells. Integration of this MS-based platform with fluorescence and brightfield microscopy provides the ability to target single cells of specific type and allows for the selection of rare cells, e.g., excretory idioblasts. Analysis of individual Egeria densa leaf blade cells (n = 103) by f LAESI MS revealed significant differences between the prespecified subpopulations of epidermal cells (n = 97) and excretory idioblasts (n = 6) that otherwise would have been masked by the population average. Primary metabolites, e.g., malate, aspartate, and ascorbate, as well as several glucosides were detected in higher abundance in the epidermal cells. The idioblasts contained lipids, e.g., PG(16:0/18:2), and triterpene saponins, e.g., medicoside I and azukisaponin I, and their isomers. Metabolic noise for themore » epidermal cells were compared to results for soybean (Glycine max) root nodule cells (n = 60) infected by rhizobia (Bradyrhizobium japonicum). Whereas some primary metabolites showed lower noise in the latter, both cell types exhibited higher noise for secondary metabolites. Post-hoc grouping of epidermal and root nodule cells, based on the abundance distributions for certain metabolites (e.g., malate), enabled the discovery of cellular subpopulations characterized by different mean abundance values, and the magnitudes of the corresponding metabolic noise. Comparison of prespecified populations from epidermal cells of the closely related E. densa (n = 20) and Elodea canadensis (n = 20) revealed significant differences, e. g., higher sugar content in the former and higher levels of ascorbate in the latter, and the presence of species-specific metabolites. These results demonstrate that the f-LAESI-MS single cell analysis platform has the potential to explore cellular heterogeneity and metabolic noise for hundreds of tissue-embedded cells.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [2];  [1]
  1. George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)
  2. Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)
  3. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1482272
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1507727
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-137441
Journal ID: ISSN 1664-462X
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830; SC0013978
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Plant Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 1664-462X
Publisher:
Frontiers Research Foundation
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Stopka, Sylwia A., Khattar, Rikkita, Agtuca, Beverly J., Anderton, Christopher R., Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana, Stacey, Gary, and Vertes, Akos. Metabolic Noise and Distinct Subpopulations Observed by Single Cell LAESI Mass Spectrometry of Plant Cells in situ. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.3389/fpls.2018.01646.
Stopka, Sylwia A., Khattar, Rikkita, Agtuca, Beverly J., Anderton, Christopher R., Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana, Stacey, Gary, & Vertes, Akos. Metabolic Noise and Distinct Subpopulations Observed by Single Cell LAESI Mass Spectrometry of Plant Cells in situ. United States. doi:10.3389/fpls.2018.01646.
Stopka, Sylwia A., Khattar, Rikkita, Agtuca, Beverly J., Anderton, Christopher R., Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana, Stacey, Gary, and Vertes, Akos. Thu . "Metabolic Noise and Distinct Subpopulations Observed by Single Cell LAESI Mass Spectrometry of Plant Cells in situ". United States. doi:10.3389/fpls.2018.01646.
@article{osti_1482272,
title = {Metabolic Noise and Distinct Subpopulations Observed by Single Cell LAESI Mass Spectrometry of Plant Cells in situ},
author = {Stopka, Sylwia A. and Khattar, Rikkita and Agtuca, Beverly J. and Anderton, Christopher R. and Pasa Tolic, Ljiljana and Stacey, Gary and Vertes, Akos},
abstractNote = {Phenotypic variations and stochastic expression of transcripts, proteins, and metabolites in biological tissues lead to cellular heterogeneity. As a result, distinct cellular subpopulations emerge. They are characterized by different metabolite expression levels and by associated metabolic noise distributions. To capture these biological variations unperturbed, highly sensitive in situ analytical techniques are needed that can sample tissue embedded single cells with minimum sample preparation. Optical fiber-based laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (f-LAESI-MS) is a promising tool for metabolic profiling of single cells. Integration of this MS-based platform with fluorescence and brightfield microscopy provides the ability to target single cells of specific type and allows for the selection of rare cells, e.g., excretory idioblasts. Analysis of individual Egeria densa leaf blade cells (n = 103) by f LAESI MS revealed significant differences between the prespecified subpopulations of epidermal cells (n = 97) and excretory idioblasts (n = 6) that otherwise would have been masked by the population average. Primary metabolites, e.g., malate, aspartate, and ascorbate, as well as several glucosides were detected in higher abundance in the epidermal cells. The idioblasts contained lipids, e.g., PG(16:0/18:2), and triterpene saponins, e.g., medicoside I and azukisaponin I, and their isomers. Metabolic noise for the epidermal cells were compared to results for soybean (Glycine max) root nodule cells (n = 60) infected by rhizobia (Bradyrhizobium japonicum). Whereas some primary metabolites showed lower noise in the latter, both cell types exhibited higher noise for secondary metabolites. Post-hoc grouping of epidermal and root nodule cells, based on the abundance distributions for certain metabolites (e.g., malate), enabled the discovery of cellular subpopulations characterized by different mean abundance values, and the magnitudes of the corresponding metabolic noise. Comparison of prespecified populations from epidermal cells of the closely related E. densa (n = 20) and Elodea canadensis (n = 20) revealed significant differences, e. g., higher sugar content in the former and higher levels of ascorbate in the latter, and the presence of species-specific metabolites. These results demonstrate that the f-LAESI-MS single cell analysis platform has the potential to explore cellular heterogeneity and metabolic noise for hundreds of tissue-embedded cells.},
doi = {10.3389/fpls.2018.01646},
journal = {Frontiers in Plant Science},
number = ,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {11}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.3389/fpls.2018.01646

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3 works
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Figures / Tables:

FIGURE 1 FIGURE 1: Schematic of f-LAESI setup for single cell analysis. A mid IR laser beam is steered by gold coated mirrors (M) and coupled through a CaF2 focusing lens (FL) into a germanium oxide-based optical fiber (GeO2 F). When the etched fiber tip is brought into close proximity of themore » cell, an ablation plume of neutrals (green dots) is produced. The expanding plume is intercepted and ionized by an electrospray (blue dots) that is on axis with the inlet orifice of the mass spectrometer. Both the optical fiber and the sample are mounted on XYZ stages for fine adjustments. A fiber monitoring microscope (FMM) is positioned under 20° elevation angle to monitor the distance between the fiber tip and the sample surface. For cell selection, a cell targeting microscope (CTM) is positioned under right angle to the sample surface.« less

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