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Title: Properties of vapor-deposited and solution-processed targets for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion experiments

Abstract

Targets for low-adiabat direct-drive–implosion experiments on OMEGA must meet rigorous specifications and tight tolerances on the diameter, wall thickness, wall-thickness uniformity, and presence of surface features. Of these, restrictions on the size and number of defects (bumps and depressions) on the surface are the most challenging. The properties of targets that are made using vapor-deposition and solution-based microencapsulation techniques are reviewed. Targets were characterized using confocal microscopy, bright- and dark-field microscopy, atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, and interferometry. Each technique has merits and limitations, and a combination of these techniques is necessary to adequately characterize a target. Furthermore, the main limitation with the glow-discharge polymerization (GDP) method for making targets is that it produces hundreds of domes with a lateral dimension of 0.7 to 2 um. Polishing these targets reduces the size of some but not all domes, but it adds scratches and grooves to the surface. Solution-made polystyrene shells lack the dome features of GDP targets but have hundreds of submicrometer-size voids throughout the wall of the target; a few of these voids can be as large as ~12 um at the surface.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)
  2. General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)
  3. Industrial Development Center, Central Research Lab., Hamamatsu City (Japan)
  4. Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan)
  5. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
Contributing Org.:
Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester
OSTI Identifier:
1481926
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1484736
Report Number(s):
2018-35, 1451
Journal ID: ISSN 2468-080X; 2018-35, 1451, 2408
Grant/Contract Number:  
NA0001944
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Matter and Radiation at Extremes
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 2468-080X
Publisher:
Science and Technology Information Center, China Academy of Engineering Physics; Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; Vapor-deposition; Direct-drive target; OMEGA; Target characterization; Solution-based microencapsulation

Citation Formats

Harding, D. R., Bonino, M. J., Sweet, W., Schoff, M., Greenwood, A., Satoh, N., Takagi, M., and Nikroo, A. Properties of vapor-deposited and solution-processed targets for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion experiments. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.mre.2018.08.001.
Harding, D. R., Bonino, M. J., Sweet, W., Schoff, M., Greenwood, A., Satoh, N., Takagi, M., & Nikroo, A. Properties of vapor-deposited and solution-processed targets for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion experiments. United States. doi:10.1016/j.mre.2018.08.001.
Harding, D. R., Bonino, M. J., Sweet, W., Schoff, M., Greenwood, A., Satoh, N., Takagi, M., and Nikroo, A. Sun . "Properties of vapor-deposited and solution-processed targets for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion experiments". United States. doi:10.1016/j.mre.2018.08.001.
@article{osti_1481926,
title = {Properties of vapor-deposited and solution-processed targets for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion experiments},
author = {Harding, D. R. and Bonino, M. J. and Sweet, W. and Schoff, M. and Greenwood, A. and Satoh, N. and Takagi, M. and Nikroo, A.},
abstractNote = {Targets for low-adiabat direct-drive–implosion experiments on OMEGA must meet rigorous specifications and tight tolerances on the diameter, wall thickness, wall-thickness uniformity, and presence of surface features. Of these, restrictions on the size and number of defects (bumps and depressions) on the surface are the most challenging. The properties of targets that are made using vapor-deposition and solution-based microencapsulation techniques are reviewed. Targets were characterized using confocal microscopy, bright- and dark-field microscopy, atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, and interferometry. Each technique has merits and limitations, and a combination of these techniques is necessary to adequately characterize a target. Furthermore, the main limitation with the glow-discharge polymerization (GDP) method for making targets is that it produces hundreds of domes with a lateral dimension of 0.7 to 2 um. Polishing these targets reduces the size of some but not all domes, but it adds scratches and grooves to the surface. Solution-made polystyrene shells lack the dome features of GDP targets but have hundreds of submicrometer-size voids throughout the wall of the target; a few of these voids can be as large as ~12 um at the surface.},
doi = {10.1016/j.mre.2018.08.001},
journal = {Matter and Radiation at Extremes},
number = 6,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {10}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1016/j.mre.2018.08.001

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Works referenced in this record:

Demonstration of Fuel Hot-Spot Pressure in Excess of 50 Gbar for Direct-Drive, Layered Deuterium-Tritium Implosions on OMEGA
journal, July 2016