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Title: Properties of vapor-deposited and solution-processed targets for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion experiments

Abstract

Targets for low-adiabat direct-drive–implosion experiments on OMEGA must meet rigorous specifications and tight tolerances on the diameter, wall thickness, wall-thickness uniformity, and presence of surface features. Of these, restrictions on the size and number of defects (bumps and depressions) on the surface are the most challenging. The properties of targets that are made using vapor-deposition and solution-based microencapsulation techniques are reviewed. Targets were characterized using confocal microscopy, bright- and dark-field microscopy, atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, and interferometry. Each technique has merits and limitations, and a combination of these techniques is necessary to adequately characterize a target. Furthermore, the main limitation with the glow-discharge polymerization (GDP) method for making targets is that it produces hundreds of domes with a lateral dimension of 0.7 to 2 um. Polishing these targets reduces the size of some but not all domes, but it adds scratches and grooves to the surface. Solution-made polystyrene shells lack the dome features of GDP targets but have hundreds of submicrometer-size voids throughout the wall of the target; a few of these voids can be as large as ~12 um at the surface.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
Contributing Org.:
Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester
OSTI Identifier:
1481926
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1484736
Report Number(s):
2018-35, 1451
Journal ID: ISSN 2468-080X; S2468080X18300517; PII: S2468080X18300517
Grant/Contract Number:  
NA0001944
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Matter and Radiation at Extremes
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Matter and Radiation at Extremes Journal Volume: 3 Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 2468-080X
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English
Subject:
70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY; Vapor-deposition; Direct-drive target; OMEGA; Target characterization; Solution-based microencapsulation

Citation Formats

Harding, D. R., Bonino, M. J., Sweet, W., Schoff, M., Greenwood, A., Satoh, N., Takagi, M., and Nikroo, A. Properties of vapor-deposited and solution-processed targets for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion experiments. Netherlands: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.mre.2018.08.001.
Harding, D. R., Bonino, M. J., Sweet, W., Schoff, M., Greenwood, A., Satoh, N., Takagi, M., & Nikroo, A. Properties of vapor-deposited and solution-processed targets for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion experiments. Netherlands. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mre.2018.08.001
Harding, D. R., Bonino, M. J., Sweet, W., Schoff, M., Greenwood, A., Satoh, N., Takagi, M., and Nikroo, A. Thu . "Properties of vapor-deposited and solution-processed targets for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion experiments". Netherlands. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mre.2018.08.001.
@article{osti_1481926,
title = {Properties of vapor-deposited and solution-processed targets for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion experiments},
author = {Harding, D. R. and Bonino, M. J. and Sweet, W. and Schoff, M. and Greenwood, A. and Satoh, N. and Takagi, M. and Nikroo, A.},
abstractNote = {Targets for low-adiabat direct-drive–implosion experiments on OMEGA must meet rigorous specifications and tight tolerances on the diameter, wall thickness, wall-thickness uniformity, and presence of surface features. Of these, restrictions on the size and number of defects (bumps and depressions) on the surface are the most challenging. The properties of targets that are made using vapor-deposition and solution-based microencapsulation techniques are reviewed. Targets were characterized using confocal microscopy, bright- and dark-field microscopy, atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, and interferometry. Each technique has merits and limitations, and a combination of these techniques is necessary to adequately characterize a target. Furthermore, the main limitation with the glow-discharge polymerization (GDP) method for making targets is that it produces hundreds of domes with a lateral dimension of 0.7 to 2 um. Polishing these targets reduces the size of some but not all domes, but it adds scratches and grooves to the surface. Solution-made polystyrene shells lack the dome features of GDP targets but have hundreds of submicrometer-size voids throughout the wall of the target; a few of these voids can be as large as ~12 um at the surface.},
doi = {10.1016/j.mre.2018.08.001},
journal = {Matter and Radiation at Extremes},
number = 6,
volume = 3,
place = {Netherlands},
year = {2018},
month = {11}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mre.2018.08.001

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Works referenced in this record:

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