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Title: Niobium tungsten oxides for high-rate lithium-ion energy storage

Here, the maximum power output and minimum charging time of a lithium-ion battery – key parameters for its use in, for example, transportation applications – depend on mixed ionic– electronic diffusion. While the discharge/charge rate and capacity can be tuned by varying the composite electrode structure, ionic transport within the active particles represents a fundamental limitation. Thus, to achieve high rates, particles are frequently reduced to nanosize dimensions despite this being disadvantageous in terms of volumetric packing density as well as cost, stability, and sustainability considerations. As an alternative to nanoscaling, we show that complex niobium tungsten oxides with topologically frustrated polyhedral arrangements and dense µm-scale particle morphologies can rapidly and reversibly intercalate large quantities of lithium. Multielectron redox, buffered volume expansion, and extremely fast lithium transport approaching that of a liquid lead to extremely high volumetric capacities and rate performance for both crystallographic shear structure and bronze-like niobium tungsten oxides. The active materials Nb 16W 5O 55 and Nb 18W 16O 93 offer new strategies toward designing electrodes with advantages in energy density, scalability, electrode architecture/complexity and cost as alternatives to the state-ofthe art high-rate anode material Li 4Ti 5O 12. The direct measurement of solid-state lithium diffusion coefficientsmore » (DLi) with pulsed field gradient NMR demonstrates room temperature DLi values of 10–12–10–13 m 2 × s -1 in the niobium tungsten oxides, which is several orders-ofmagnitude faster than typical electrode materials and corresponds to a characteristic diffusion length of ~10 µm for a 1 minute discharge. Materials and mechanisms that enable lithiation of µm particles in minutes have implications for high power applications, fast charging devices, all-solid-state batteries, and general approaches to electrode design and material discovery.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3] ;  [1] ;  [1]
  1. Univ. of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)
  2. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  3. Diamond Light Source, Didcot (United Kingdom)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature (London)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Nature (London); Journal Volume: 559; Journal Issue: 7715; Journal ID: ISSN 0028-0836
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Research Org:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC); USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; battery; bronze structure; fast charging; niobium oxide
OSTI Identifier:
1480438

Griffith, Kent J., Wiaderek, Kamila M., Cibin, Giannantonio, Marbella, Lauren E., and Grey, Clare P.. Niobium tungsten oxides for high-rate lithium-ion energy storage. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1038/s41586-018-0347-0.
Griffith, Kent J., Wiaderek, Kamila M., Cibin, Giannantonio, Marbella, Lauren E., & Grey, Clare P.. Niobium tungsten oxides for high-rate lithium-ion energy storage. United States. doi:10.1038/s41586-018-0347-0.
Griffith, Kent J., Wiaderek, Kamila M., Cibin, Giannantonio, Marbella, Lauren E., and Grey, Clare P.. 2018. "Niobium tungsten oxides for high-rate lithium-ion energy storage". United States. doi:10.1038/s41586-018-0347-0.
@article{osti_1480438,
title = {Niobium tungsten oxides for high-rate lithium-ion energy storage},
author = {Griffith, Kent J. and Wiaderek, Kamila M. and Cibin, Giannantonio and Marbella, Lauren E. and Grey, Clare P.},
abstractNote = {Here, the maximum power output and minimum charging time of a lithium-ion battery – key parameters for its use in, for example, transportation applications – depend on mixed ionic– electronic diffusion. While the discharge/charge rate and capacity can be tuned by varying the composite electrode structure, ionic transport within the active particles represents a fundamental limitation. Thus, to achieve high rates, particles are frequently reduced to nanosize dimensions despite this being disadvantageous in terms of volumetric packing density as well as cost, stability, and sustainability considerations. As an alternative to nanoscaling, we show that complex niobium tungsten oxides with topologically frustrated polyhedral arrangements and dense µm-scale particle morphologies can rapidly and reversibly intercalate large quantities of lithium. Multielectron redox, buffered volume expansion, and extremely fast lithium transport approaching that of a liquid lead to extremely high volumetric capacities and rate performance for both crystallographic shear structure and bronze-like niobium tungsten oxides. The active materials Nb16W5O55 and Nb18W16O93 offer new strategies toward designing electrodes with advantages in energy density, scalability, electrode architecture/complexity and cost as alternatives to the state-ofthe art high-rate anode material Li4Ti5O12. The direct measurement of solid-state lithium diffusion coefficients (DLi) with pulsed field gradient NMR demonstrates room temperature DLi values of 10–12–10–13 m2 × s-1 in the niobium tungsten oxides, which is several orders-ofmagnitude faster than typical electrode materials and corresponds to a characteristic diffusion length of ~10 µm for a 1 minute discharge. Materials and mechanisms that enable lithiation of µm particles in minutes have implications for high power applications, fast charging devices, all-solid-state batteries, and general approaches to electrode design and material discovery.},
doi = {10.1038/s41586-018-0347-0},
journal = {Nature (London)},
number = 7715,
volume = 559,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {7}
}

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