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Title: Passive Radiative “Thermostat” Enabled by Phase-Change Photonic Nanostructures

Abstract

A thermostat senses the temperature of a physical system and switches heating or cooling devices on or off, regulating the flow of heat to maintain the system’s temperature near a desired set point. Taking advantage of recent advances in radiative heat transfer technologies, here we propose a passive radiative “thermostat” based on phase-change photonic nanostructures for thermal regulation at room temperature. By self-adjusting their visible to mid-IR absorptivity and emissivity responses depending on the ambient temperature, the proposed devices use the sky to passively cool or heat during day-time using the phase-change transition temperature as the set point, while at night-time temperature is maintained at or below ambient. We simulate the performance of a passive nanophotonic thermostat design based on vanadium dioxide thin films, showing daytime passive cooling (heating) with respect to ambient in hot (cold) days, maintaining an equilibrium temperature approximately locked within the phase transition region. Furthermore, passive radiative thermostats can potentially enable novel thermal management technologies, for example, to moderate diurnal temperature in regions with extreme annual thermal swings.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program
OSTI Identifier:
1480047
Report Number(s):
[LA-UR-18-25694]
[Journal ID: ISSN 2330-4022]
Grant/Contract Number:  
[AC52-06NA25396]
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
ACS Photonics
Additional Journal Information:
[ Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 11]; Journal ID: ISSN 2330-4022
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; Energy Sciences; Material Science; radiative cooling; selective emission; solar absorber; thermochromic materials

Citation Formats

Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M., Kramadhati, Shobhita, Azad, Abul Kalam, Reiten, Matthew Thomas, and Dalvit, Diego Alejandro Roberto. Passive Radiative “Thermostat” Enabled by Phase-Change Photonic Nanostructures. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1021/acsphotonics.8b01026.
Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M., Kramadhati, Shobhita, Azad, Abul Kalam, Reiten, Matthew Thomas, & Dalvit, Diego Alejandro Roberto. Passive Radiative “Thermostat” Enabled by Phase-Change Photonic Nanostructures. United States. doi:10.1021/acsphotonics.8b01026.
Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M., Kramadhati, Shobhita, Azad, Abul Kalam, Reiten, Matthew Thomas, and Dalvit, Diego Alejandro Roberto. Wed . "Passive Radiative “Thermostat” Enabled by Phase-Change Photonic Nanostructures". United States. doi:10.1021/acsphotonics.8b01026. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1480047.
@article{osti_1480047,
title = {Passive Radiative “Thermostat” Enabled by Phase-Change Photonic Nanostructures},
author = {Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M. and Kramadhati, Shobhita and Azad, Abul Kalam and Reiten, Matthew Thomas and Dalvit, Diego Alejandro Roberto},
abstractNote = {A thermostat senses the temperature of a physical system and switches heating or cooling devices on or off, regulating the flow of heat to maintain the system’s temperature near a desired set point. Taking advantage of recent advances in radiative heat transfer technologies, here we propose a passive radiative “thermostat” based on phase-change photonic nanostructures for thermal regulation at room temperature. By self-adjusting their visible to mid-IR absorptivity and emissivity responses depending on the ambient temperature, the proposed devices use the sky to passively cool or heat during day-time using the phase-change transition temperature as the set point, while at night-time temperature is maintained at or below ambient. We simulate the performance of a passive nanophotonic thermostat design based on vanadium dioxide thin films, showing daytime passive cooling (heating) with respect to ambient in hot (cold) days, maintaining an equilibrium temperature approximately locked within the phase transition region. Furthermore, passive radiative thermostats can potentially enable novel thermal management technologies, for example, to moderate diurnal temperature in regions with extreme annual thermal swings.},
doi = {10.1021/acsphotonics.8b01026},
journal = {ACS Photonics},
number = [11],
volume = [5],
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {10}
}

Journal Article:
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Cited by: 4 works
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Figures / Tables:

Figure 1 Figure 1: Temperature management with passive photonic devices. Schematic representation of a mid-infrared emitter (a) and a solar absorber (b) with idealized selective emissivity (blue) and absorptivity (red), as shown in (c). The orange and green backgrounds correspond to the AM1.5 solar spectrum and the atmospheric transmissivity, respectively. (d, e) Typical equilibrium temperatures of the idealized emitter (blue) and absorber (red) with respect to the ambient temperature (green) during hot and cold days. In both plots the nonzero absorptivity and emissivity were chosen as a = 0.25 and e = 1, and we modeled the time-dependent total solar irradiance using a Gaussian distribution between 6 and 18 h with peak irradiance of 900 W/m2 at noon. The ambient temperature profile ismore » $T$amb(t) = $T$$^{avg}_{amb}$ + $ΔT$amb sin[2$π$(t(h) − 11)/24] with $T$$^{avg}_{amb}$ = 25 °C, $ΔT$amb = 5 °C in (d), and $T$$^{avg}_{amb}$ = 5 °C, $ΔT$amb = 10 °C in (e).« less

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Works referencing / citing this record:

Broadband switching of mid-infrared atmospheric windows by VO 2 -based thermal emitter
journal, January 2019


    Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.