skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Chemical Sensing Strategies for Real-Time Monitoring of Transformer Oil: A Review

Abstract

Power transformers are a central component in the field of energy distribution and transmission. The early recognition of incipient faults in operating transformers is substantially cost effective by lessening impromptu blackouts. A standout amongst the most responsive and dependable strategies utilized for assessing the health of oil filled electrical equipment is dissolved gas analysis (DGA). Nowadays, there is an expanding requirement for better nonintrusive diagnostic and online monitoring tools to survey the internal state of the transformers. Chemical sensors are viewed as a key innovation for condition monitoring of transformer health, coordinating the non-invasiveness with typical sensor features, such as cost, usability, portability, and the integration with the data networks. Low-cost chemical sensors-based DGA techniques are expected to drastically augment the diagnostic abilities empowering the deployment on a broader range of oil filled power assets. The recent development involves both specific sensors designed to detect individual dissolved gas in transformer oil and non-specific sensors, operated in near ambient conditions, with the potential to be applied in a DGA system. In this paper, general background and operating guidelines of DGA are presented to address the origin of the gas formation, methods for their detection and the interpretation of the results bymore » data analytics. The recent significant interest and advancements in chemical sensors to DGA applications are reviewed. Lastly, future research perspectives and challenges for the development of novel DGA chemical sensors are also discussed.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)
  2. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV (United States). In-house Research
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1479646
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
IEEE Sensors Journal
Additional Journal Information:
[ Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue: 18]; Journal ID: ISSN 1530-437X
Publisher:
IEEE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Sun, Chenhu, Ohodnicki, Paul R., and Stewart, Emma M. Chemical Sensing Strategies for Real-Time Monitoring of Transformer Oil: A Review. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1109/jsen.2017.2735193.
Sun, Chenhu, Ohodnicki, Paul R., & Stewart, Emma M. Chemical Sensing Strategies for Real-Time Monitoring of Transformer Oil: A Review. United States. doi:10.1109/jsen.2017.2735193.
Sun, Chenhu, Ohodnicki, Paul R., and Stewart, Emma M. Fri . "Chemical Sensing Strategies for Real-Time Monitoring of Transformer Oil: A Review". United States. doi:10.1109/jsen.2017.2735193. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1479646.
@article{osti_1479646,
title = {Chemical Sensing Strategies for Real-Time Monitoring of Transformer Oil: A Review},
author = {Sun, Chenhu and Ohodnicki, Paul R. and Stewart, Emma M.},
abstractNote = {Power transformers are a central component in the field of energy distribution and transmission. The early recognition of incipient faults in operating transformers is substantially cost effective by lessening impromptu blackouts. A standout amongst the most responsive and dependable strategies utilized for assessing the health of oil filled electrical equipment is dissolved gas analysis (DGA). Nowadays, there is an expanding requirement for better nonintrusive diagnostic and online monitoring tools to survey the internal state of the transformers. Chemical sensors are viewed as a key innovation for condition monitoring of transformer health, coordinating the non-invasiveness with typical sensor features, such as cost, usability, portability, and the integration with the data networks. Low-cost chemical sensors-based DGA techniques are expected to drastically augment the diagnostic abilities empowering the deployment on a broader range of oil filled power assets. The recent development involves both specific sensors designed to detect individual dissolved gas in transformer oil and non-specific sensors, operated in near ambient conditions, with the potential to be applied in a DGA system. In this paper, general background and operating guidelines of DGA are presented to address the origin of the gas formation, methods for their detection and the interpretation of the results by data analytics. The recent significant interest and advancements in chemical sensors to DGA applications are reviewed. Lastly, future research perspectives and challenges for the development of novel DGA chemical sensors are also discussed.},
doi = {10.1109/jsen.2017.2735193},
journal = {IEEE Sensors Journal},
number = [18],
volume = [17],
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {9}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 14 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share: