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Title: Morphological instability of aqueous dissolution of silicate glasses and minerals [Nonlinear dynamics of aqueous dissolution of silicate glasses and minerals: Morphological instability]

Abstract

Understanding of aqueous dissolution of silicate glasses and minerals is of great importance to both Earth science and materials science. Silicate dissolution exhibits complex temporal evolution and spatial pattern formations. Recently, we showed how observed complexity could emerge from a simple self-organizational mechanism: dissolution of the silica framework in a material could be catalyzed by the cations released from the reaction itself. This mechanism enables us to systematically predict many key features of a silicate dissolution process including the occurrence of a sharp corrosion front (vs. a leached surface layer), oscillatory dissolution and multiple stages of the alteration process (e.g., an alteration rate resumption at a late stage of glass dissolution). Here, through a linear stability analysis, we show that this same mechanism can also lead to morphological instability of an alteration front, which, in combination with oscillatory dissolution, can potentially lead to a whole suite of patterning phenomena, as observed on archaeological glass samples, including wavy dissolution fronts, growth rings, incoherent bandings of alteration products, and corrosion pitting. Here, the result thus further demonstrates the importance of the proposed self-accelerating mechanism in silicate material degradation.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. Univ. of Bonn, Bonn (Germany)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1478405
Report Number(s):
SAND-2018-0206J
Journal ID: ISSN 2397-2106; 659823
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
npj Materials Degradation
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2397-2106
Publisher:
Springer
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Wang, Yifeng, Jove-Colon, Carlos F., Kuhlman, Kristopher L., Lenting, Christoph, and Icenhower, Jonathan. Morphological instability of aqueous dissolution of silicate glasses and minerals [Nonlinear dynamics of aqueous dissolution of silicate glasses and minerals: Morphological instability]. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1038/s41529-018-0047-0.
Wang, Yifeng, Jove-Colon, Carlos F., Kuhlman, Kristopher L., Lenting, Christoph, & Icenhower, Jonathan. Morphological instability of aqueous dissolution of silicate glasses and minerals [Nonlinear dynamics of aqueous dissolution of silicate glasses and minerals: Morphological instability]. United States. doi:10.1038/s41529-018-0047-0.
Wang, Yifeng, Jove-Colon, Carlos F., Kuhlman, Kristopher L., Lenting, Christoph, and Icenhower, Jonathan. Tue . "Morphological instability of aqueous dissolution of silicate glasses and minerals [Nonlinear dynamics of aqueous dissolution of silicate glasses and minerals: Morphological instability]". United States. doi:10.1038/s41529-018-0047-0. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1478405.
@article{osti_1478405,
title = {Morphological instability of aqueous dissolution of silicate glasses and minerals [Nonlinear dynamics of aqueous dissolution of silicate glasses and minerals: Morphological instability]},
author = {Wang, Yifeng and Jove-Colon, Carlos F. and Kuhlman, Kristopher L. and Lenting, Christoph and Icenhower, Jonathan},
abstractNote = {Understanding of aqueous dissolution of silicate glasses and minerals is of great importance to both Earth science and materials science. Silicate dissolution exhibits complex temporal evolution and spatial pattern formations. Recently, we showed how observed complexity could emerge from a simple self-organizational mechanism: dissolution of the silica framework in a material could be catalyzed by the cations released from the reaction itself. This mechanism enables us to systematically predict many key features of a silicate dissolution process including the occurrence of a sharp corrosion front (vs. a leached surface layer), oscillatory dissolution and multiple stages of the alteration process (e.g., an alteration rate resumption at a late stage of glass dissolution). Here, through a linear stability analysis, we show that this same mechanism can also lead to morphological instability of an alteration front, which, in combination with oscillatory dissolution, can potentially lead to a whole suite of patterning phenomena, as observed on archaeological glass samples, including wavy dissolution fronts, growth rings, incoherent bandings of alteration products, and corrosion pitting. Here, the result thus further demonstrates the importance of the proposed self-accelerating mechanism in silicate material degradation.},
doi = {10.1038/s41529-018-0047-0},
journal = {npj Materials Degradation},
number = 1,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}

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