skip to main content

DOE PAGESDOE PAGES

Title: Quantifying dry supercritical CO 2-induced changes of the Utica Shale

Traditionally, shale formations have been studied as sealing layers that prevent vertical migration of hydrocarbons and CO 2 due to their low permeability and fracture porosity. Recent research has focused on storing CO 2 in hydrocarbon-bearing shale formations that have already undergone depletion through primary production and using CO 2 as a potential fracturing agent for unconventional reservoirs. The injected CO 2 will interact with shale components (i.e. clays, organic matter) and affect rock properties through chemical alteration, matrix swelling/shrinkage, and related geomechanical effects. As changes in rock properties will impact both anthropogenic CO 2 storage and hydraulic fracturing, it is imperative to increase our understanding of the CO 2-shale interactions. In-situ Fourier Transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy coupled with high temperature and pressure capability was used to examine the interaction of dry CO 2 on Utica Shale, clay, and kerogen samples at the molecular scale and characterize vibrational changes of sorption bands sensitive to the gas-solid environment. The Utica Shale was also analyzed for micro and macro-scale chemical and physical changes before and after exposure to dry CO 2 at subsurface storage conditions using surface relocation techniques via high-resolution field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area/pore size analysismore » and quantitative adsorption isotherms were applied to understand changes in surface area, pore volumes, and understand the storage potential of CO 2 in the Utica Shale sample. FT-IR and feature relocation via FE-SEM indicate carbonate formation and dissolution occurs in shale exposed to dry CO 2. Results indicate that etching and pitting occur, with minor calcite precipitation along the surface of the shale sample. Furthermore, quantitative isotherm results indicate that shales with a higher content of kerogen and illite-smectite clays would be expected to have the highest CO 2 storage capacity provided these constituents were accessible for interaction.« less
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [3] ;  [1] ;  [4] ;  [2]
  1. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); AECOM Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)
  2. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)
  3. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)
  4. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
FE0004000
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Fuel
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 226; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0016-2361
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CO2 storage; shale; CO2; clay; kerogen; carbonate; dissolution; etching
OSTI Identifier:
1478225

Sanguinito, Sean, Goodman, Angela, Tkach, Mary, Kutchko, Barbara, Culp, Jeffrey, Natesakhawat, Sittichai, Fazio, Jim, Fukai, Isis, and Crandall, Dustin. Quantifying dry supercritical CO2-induced changes of the Utica Shale. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1016/j.fuel.2018.03.156.
Sanguinito, Sean, Goodman, Angela, Tkach, Mary, Kutchko, Barbara, Culp, Jeffrey, Natesakhawat, Sittichai, Fazio, Jim, Fukai, Isis, & Crandall, Dustin. Quantifying dry supercritical CO2-induced changes of the Utica Shale. United States. doi:10.1016/j.fuel.2018.03.156.
Sanguinito, Sean, Goodman, Angela, Tkach, Mary, Kutchko, Barbara, Culp, Jeffrey, Natesakhawat, Sittichai, Fazio, Jim, Fukai, Isis, and Crandall, Dustin. 2018. "Quantifying dry supercritical CO2-induced changes of the Utica Shale". United States. doi:10.1016/j.fuel.2018.03.156. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1478225.
@article{osti_1478225,
title = {Quantifying dry supercritical CO2-induced changes of the Utica Shale},
author = {Sanguinito, Sean and Goodman, Angela and Tkach, Mary and Kutchko, Barbara and Culp, Jeffrey and Natesakhawat, Sittichai and Fazio, Jim and Fukai, Isis and Crandall, Dustin},
abstractNote = {Traditionally, shale formations have been studied as sealing layers that prevent vertical migration of hydrocarbons and CO2 due to their low permeability and fracture porosity. Recent research has focused on storing CO2 in hydrocarbon-bearing shale formations that have already undergone depletion through primary production and using CO2 as a potential fracturing agent for unconventional reservoirs. The injected CO2 will interact with shale components (i.e. clays, organic matter) and affect rock properties through chemical alteration, matrix swelling/shrinkage, and related geomechanical effects. As changes in rock properties will impact both anthropogenic CO2 storage and hydraulic fracturing, it is imperative to increase our understanding of the CO2-shale interactions. In-situ Fourier Transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy coupled with high temperature and pressure capability was used to examine the interaction of dry CO2 on Utica Shale, clay, and kerogen samples at the molecular scale and characterize vibrational changes of sorption bands sensitive to the gas-solid environment. The Utica Shale was also analyzed for micro and macro-scale chemical and physical changes before and after exposure to dry CO2 at subsurface storage conditions using surface relocation techniques via high-resolution field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area/pore size analysis and quantitative adsorption isotherms were applied to understand changes in surface area, pore volumes, and understand the storage potential of CO2 in the Utica Shale sample. FT-IR and feature relocation via FE-SEM indicate carbonate formation and dissolution occurs in shale exposed to dry CO2. Results indicate that etching and pitting occur, with minor calcite precipitation along the surface of the shale sample. Furthermore, quantitative isotherm results indicate that shales with a higher content of kerogen and illite-smectite clays would be expected to have the highest CO2 storage capacity provided these constituents were accessible for interaction.},
doi = {10.1016/j.fuel.2018.03.156},
journal = {Fuel},
number = C,
volume = 226,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}