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Title: Superresolution Diffuse Optical Imaging by Localization of Fluorescence

The multiple scattering of light presents major challenges in realizing useful in vivo imaging at tissue depths of more than about one millimeter, where many answers to health questions lie. Visible through near-infrared photons can be readily and safely detected through centimeters of tissue; however, limited information is available for image formation. One strategy for obtaining images is to model the photon transport and a simple incoherent model is the diffusion equation approximation to the Boltzmann transport equation. Such an approach provides a prediction of the mean intensity of heavily scattered light and hence provides a forward model for optimization-based computational imaging. While diffuse optical imaging methods have received substantial attention, they remain restricted in terms of resolution because of the loss of high-spatial-frequency information that is associated with the multiple scattering of photons. Consequently, only relatively large inhomogeneities, such as tumors or organs in small animals, can be effectively resolved. We introduce a superresolution imaging approach based on point localization in a diffusion framework that enables over two orders of magnitude improvement in the spatial resolution of diffuse optical imaging. The method is demonstrated experimentally by localizing a fluorescent inhomogeneity in a highly scattering slab and characterizing the localizationmore » uncertainty. The approach allows imaging through centimeters of tissue with a resolution of tens of microns, thereby enabling cells or cell clusters to be resolved. More generally, this high-resolution imaging approach could be applied with any physical transport or wave model and hence to a broad class of physical problems. Finally, paired with a suitable optical contrast mechanism, as can be realized with targeted fluorescent molecules or genetically modified animals, superresolution diffuse imaging should open alternative dimensions for in vivo applications.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [2]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)
  2. Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
SAND2018-5205J
Journal ID: ISSN 2331-7019; 663157
Grant/Contract Number:
NA0003525; CISE-1218909; CISE-1618908; 1R21CA182235-01A1
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physical Review Applied
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 2331-7019
Publisher:
American Physical Society (APS)
Research Org:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE; National Science Foundation (NSF); National Inst. of Health (NIH) (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; classical optics; imaging & optical processing; light-matter interaction; fluorescence; medical imaging; static light scattering; super-resolution techniques
OSTI Identifier:
1477869

Bentz, Brian Z., Lin, Dergan, and Webb, Kevin J.. Superresolution Diffuse Optical Imaging by Localization of Fluorescence. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevApplied.10.034021.
Bentz, Brian Z., Lin, Dergan, & Webb, Kevin J.. Superresolution Diffuse Optical Imaging by Localization of Fluorescence. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevApplied.10.034021.
Bentz, Brian Z., Lin, Dergan, and Webb, Kevin J.. 2018. "Superresolution Diffuse Optical Imaging by Localization of Fluorescence". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevApplied.10.034021.
@article{osti_1477869,
title = {Superresolution Diffuse Optical Imaging by Localization of Fluorescence},
author = {Bentz, Brian Z. and Lin, Dergan and Webb, Kevin J.},
abstractNote = {The multiple scattering of light presents major challenges in realizing useful in vivo imaging at tissue depths of more than about one millimeter, where many answers to health questions lie. Visible through near-infrared photons can be readily and safely detected through centimeters of tissue; however, limited information is available for image formation. One strategy for obtaining images is to model the photon transport and a simple incoherent model is the diffusion equation approximation to the Boltzmann transport equation. Such an approach provides a prediction of the mean intensity of heavily scattered light and hence provides a forward model for optimization-based computational imaging. While diffuse optical imaging methods have received substantial attention, they remain restricted in terms of resolution because of the loss of high-spatial-frequency information that is associated with the multiple scattering of photons. Consequently, only relatively large inhomogeneities, such as tumors or organs in small animals, can be effectively resolved. We introduce a superresolution imaging approach based on point localization in a diffusion framework that enables over two orders of magnitude improvement in the spatial resolution of diffuse optical imaging. The method is demonstrated experimentally by localizing a fluorescent inhomogeneity in a highly scattering slab and characterizing the localization uncertainty. The approach allows imaging through centimeters of tissue with a resolution of tens of microns, thereby enabling cells or cell clusters to be resolved. More generally, this high-resolution imaging approach could be applied with any physical transport or wave model and hence to a broad class of physical problems. Finally, paired with a suitable optical contrast mechanism, as can be realized with targeted fluorescent molecules or genetically modified animals, superresolution diffuse imaging should open alternative dimensions for in vivo applications.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevApplied.10.034021},
journal = {Physical Review Applied},
number = 3,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}

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