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Title: Detecting subsurface fluid leaks in real-time using injection and production rates

Abstract

Here, CO 2 injection into geologic formations for either enhanced oil recovery or carbon storage introduces a risk for undesired fluid leakage into overlying groundwater or to the surface. Despite decades of subsurface CO 2 production and injection, the technologies and methods for detecting CO 2 leaks are still costly and prone to large uncertainties. This is especially true for pressure-based monitoring methods, which require the use of simplified geological and reservoir flow models to simulate the pressure behavior as well as background noise affecting pressure measurements.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States)
  2. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Albany, OR and Morgantown, WV (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1477844
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1549399
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advances in Water Resources
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 110; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0309-1708
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; Real-time; Leak detection; Injection/production rates; CO2; Compressibility; Carbon storage; Capacitance resistance model

Citation Formats

Singh, Harpreet, and Huerta, Nicolas J. Detecting subsurface fluid leaks in real-time using injection and production rates. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.advwatres.2017.10.012.
Singh, Harpreet, & Huerta, Nicolas J. Detecting subsurface fluid leaks in real-time using injection and production rates. United States. doi:10.1016/j.advwatres.2017.10.012.
Singh, Harpreet, and Huerta, Nicolas J. Thu . "Detecting subsurface fluid leaks in real-time using injection and production rates". United States. doi:10.1016/j.advwatres.2017.10.012. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1477844.
@article{osti_1477844,
title = {Detecting subsurface fluid leaks in real-time using injection and production rates},
author = {Singh, Harpreet and Huerta, Nicolas J.},
abstractNote = {Here, CO2 injection into geologic formations for either enhanced oil recovery or carbon storage introduces a risk for undesired fluid leakage into overlying groundwater or to the surface. Despite decades of subsurface CO2 production and injection, the technologies and methods for detecting CO2 leaks are still costly and prone to large uncertainties. This is especially true for pressure-based monitoring methods, which require the use of simplified geological and reservoir flow models to simulate the pressure behavior as well as background noise affecting pressure measurements.},
doi = {10.1016/j.advwatres.2017.10.012},
journal = {Advances in Water Resources},
number = C,
volume = 110,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {10}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Cited by: 6 works
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