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Title: Quantitative modeling of energy dissipation in Arabidopsis thaliana

In photosynthesis, solar energy is absorbed and converted into chemical energy. Chlorophyll embedded in proteins absorb light and transfer excitation energy to reaction centers where charge separation occurs. However, the solar flux incident on photosynthetic organisms is highly variable, requiring complex feedback systems to regulate the excitation pressure on reaction centers and prevent excess absorbed energy from causing damage. During periods of transient high light, excess absorbed energy is dissipated as heat. This is routinely observed as the quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence, and often broadly referred to as non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Understanding the mechanisms through which photosynthetic systems dissipate excess energy and regulate excitation pressure in response to variable light conditions requires extensive quantitative modeling of the photosynthetic system and energy dissipation to interpret experimental observations. This review discusses efforts to model energy dissipation, or quenching, in Arabidopsis thaliana and their connections to models of regulatory systems that control quenching. We begin with a review of theory used to describe energy transfer and experimental data obtained to construct energy transfer models of the photosynthetic antenna system that underlie the interpretation of chlorophyll fluorescence quenching. Second, experimental evidence leading to proposed molecular mechanisms of quenching and the implications for modeling aremore » discussed. The initial incorporation of depictions of proposed mechanisms into quantitative energy transfer models is reviewed. Finally, the necessity of connecting energy transfer models that include molecular models of quenching mechanisms with regulatory models is discussed.« less
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ;  [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kavli Energy Nanoscience Inst., Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental and Experimental Botany
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 154; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0098-8472
Publisher:
Elsevier
Research Org:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1477398

Morris, Jonathan M., and Fleming, Graham R.. Quantitative modeling of energy dissipation in Arabidopsis thaliana. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1016/j.envexpbot.2018.03.021.
Morris, Jonathan M., & Fleming, Graham R.. Quantitative modeling of energy dissipation in Arabidopsis thaliana. United States. doi:10.1016/j.envexpbot.2018.03.021.
Morris, Jonathan M., and Fleming, Graham R.. 2018. "Quantitative modeling of energy dissipation in Arabidopsis thaliana". United States. doi:10.1016/j.envexpbot.2018.03.021. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1477398.
@article{osti_1477398,
title = {Quantitative modeling of energy dissipation in Arabidopsis thaliana},
author = {Morris, Jonathan M. and Fleming, Graham R.},
abstractNote = {In photosynthesis, solar energy is absorbed and converted into chemical energy. Chlorophyll embedded in proteins absorb light and transfer excitation energy to reaction centers where charge separation occurs. However, the solar flux incident on photosynthetic organisms is highly variable, requiring complex feedback systems to regulate the excitation pressure on reaction centers and prevent excess absorbed energy from causing damage. During periods of transient high light, excess absorbed energy is dissipated as heat. This is routinely observed as the quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence, and often broadly referred to as non-photochemical quenching (NPQ). Understanding the mechanisms through which photosynthetic systems dissipate excess energy and regulate excitation pressure in response to variable light conditions requires extensive quantitative modeling of the photosynthetic system and energy dissipation to interpret experimental observations. This review discusses efforts to model energy dissipation, or quenching, in Arabidopsis thaliana and their connections to models of regulatory systems that control quenching. We begin with a review of theory used to describe energy transfer and experimental data obtained to construct energy transfer models of the photosynthetic antenna system that underlie the interpretation of chlorophyll fluorescence quenching. Second, experimental evidence leading to proposed molecular mechanisms of quenching and the implications for modeling are discussed. The initial incorporation of depictions of proposed mechanisms into quantitative energy transfer models is reviewed. Finally, the necessity of connecting energy transfer models that include molecular models of quenching mechanisms with regulatory models is discussed.},
doi = {10.1016/j.envexpbot.2018.03.021},
journal = {Environmental and Experimental Botany},
number = C,
volume = 154,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {4}
}